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ViIDEO -Aquanchor- it being used, how it works and how it was built.

Discussion in 'Archives - Yahoo Canyons Group' started by RAM, Dec 3, 2012.

  1. RAM

    RAM Guest

    Wanna see something pretty cool?

    This was the very first test and use of the Aguanchor (May 2011) and the only footage of how it looks when it empties. Several important improvements have been made to the device since then.

    1- The yellow plastic cord, which takes the PVC sealing device, is now sewn into the fabric, making for a more secure fastening

    2-Webbing has been added to the pull side, in a "Y" shape with an end going to the opposite corner of where the water spills out. that end of the webbing slightly longer. The result is the pipe pulls off, the water starts to empty and THEN a second later the back side of the trap pulls up in the air, emptying the water more effectively so that the trap is almost always empty of water before coming over the drop.

    3-You will note some brown leather cloth as part of the system. It has a hole on each side of it and the rope fits through. It is used for lightweight groove protection. A small piece of garden hose, with some 8mm rope through it is also a tool we use for this. It should be noted, as is obvious from the video, the Aguanchor is very low friction when being pulled. One must be much more vigilant about friction with the sandtrap. Both these tool accomplish that

    http://vimeo.com/53952364







    --- In Yahoo Canyons Group, "RAM" <adkramoo@...> wrote:
    I have heard some say that the use of sandtraps, aguanchors and fiddlestix are heavy and cumbersome solutions to rappelling. That they would never carry all that extra weight. While the folks that said these things have never seen these tools, let alone used one, it did get me thinking about the weight and size.
    We don't take these anchors everywhere. Well maybe the Fiddlestix. It doesn't play in certain areas that well and is weight that can be saved in trade routes. It is invaluable on explorations in Escalante, Glen Canyon and some other places and in any of the many places bolts are now illegal. I sleep so much better than before, tackling the unknown. Not sure how we had the nerve to drop some of these canyons before we had these tools.
    We normally carry both the sandtrap and the aguanchor in one potshot. Fits inside quite nicely and packs. For kicks, I added the fiddlestick to the package and weighed it. Including the rapides attached to the anchors that make it "ready for use," it came in at about 3 lb 6 ozs. for everything including the potshot.
    I grabbed other gear to see what weighs about the same. A 110 foot, 9mm rope WITHOUT the rope bag is comparable. And the anchor package packs much smaller than the rope. It is hardly the cumbersome deal some skeptics have speculated it to be.
    Both Shane and Cabe have said the watertrap is sure to kill someone. This is unlikely as there is only a hand full of them in use and there are no plans for any more to be made. The sharing of the devise was about "sharing the possible", not proposing it become standard. If it were to spark ideas among innovators, then other methods will be developed. Throw the seeds and see what happens.
    Great credit is due Jenny West for conceiving the idea, then designing the devise, then building half a dozen of them, testing the various one's she designed and built, modifying them, then field testing them in a safe fashion. Kudos. A fully functional and visionary prototype that was clearly the best option on several occasions.
    There were a major rainstorm in both the middle of September and one in the middle of October this fall. The aguanchor got most of it use after these storms, when so many anchor options were under water. This is a valid niche for the tool. I am less nervous about canyoneering after storms now.
    Finally a short tale. On a canyon out on the Glen, that we made a first modern descent on, the next to last rap, is a 25 foot overhanging Drop. We fiddlesticked a log the first time. The 2nd time we went, the log had been washed away, but a sandtrap had perfect geometry. The 3rd time we visited the place was after the October storm and this spot was 3 feet deep in water. You know what we did.
    The same spot, three different trips, three different solutions, due to changing conditions. These systems have been called clunky and heavy handed. Yet nothing was left. No rocks were farmed, stacked or buried. The sand and water used stayed pretty much where is was gotten, at the top of the anchor. Pretty nifty if you ask me.
    While caution is advised during the "learning curve" with these tools, it is unquestioned by those who have SEEN these tools in use, that it is very real steps taken to the "leave no trace" ethic. > Ram
    --- In Yahoo Canyons Group, "RAM" <adkramoo@> wrote:

    > here is a photo collection of the application of the Aguanchor

    <a href="https://picasaweb.google.com/aramv14/WatertrapAnchorApplied?authkey=Gv1sRgCN_67-GPlraAyAE">https://picasaweb.google.com/aramv14/WatertrapAnchorApplied?authkey=Gv1sRgCN_67-GPlraAyAE</a

    > Then a demo

    <a href="https://picasaweb.google.com/aramv14/WaterBagVideo#5477484498946189938">https://picasaweb.google.com/aramv14/WaterBagVideo#5477484498946189938</a

    > What the spot looked like in lower water 5 months earlier. This picture and the next 7
    <a href="https://picasaweb.google.com/aramv14/Rhapsody42412#5737372194377659874">https://picasaweb.google.com/aramv14/Rhapsody42412#5737372194377659874</a

    > Jenny the inventor of the Auganchor and her visual how to build one, picture book
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/carverat297/sets/72157628062414488/
  2. Randi

    Randi Guest

    VERY VERY VERY Cool!!! :)

    --- On Mon, 12/3/12, RAM adkramoo@aol.com> wrote:

    From: RAM adkramoo@aol.com> Subject: [from Canyons Group] Re: ViIDEO -Aquanchor- it being used, how it works and how it was built. To: Yahoo Canyons Group Date: Monday, December 3, 2012, 6:29 AM















     









    Wanna see something pretty cool?



    This was the very first test and use of the Aguanchor (May 2011) and the only footage of how it looks when it empties. Several important improvements have been made to the device since then.



    1- The yellow plastic cord, which takes the PVC sealing device, is now sewn into the fabric, making for a more secure fastening



    2-Webbing has been added to the pull side, in a "Y" shape with an end going to the opposite corner of where the water spills out. that end of the webbing slightly longer. The result is the pipe pulls off, the water starts to empty and THEN a second later the back side of the trap pulls up in the air, emptying the water more effectively so that the trap is almost always empty of water before coming over the drop.



    3-You will note some brown leather cloth as part of the system. It has a hole on each side of it and the rope fits through. It is used for lightweight groove protection. A small piece of garden hose, with some 8mm rope through it is also a tool we use for this. It should be noted, as is obvious from the video, the Aguanchor is very low friction when being pulled. One must be much more vigilant about friction with the sandtrap. Both these tool accomplish that



    http://vimeo.com/53952364



    --- In Yahoo Canyons Group, "RAM" <adkramoo@...> wrote:

    >

    > I have heard some say that the use of sandtraps, aguanchors and fiddlestix are heavy and cumbersome solutions to rappelling. That they would never carry all that extra weight. While the folks that said these things have never seen these tools, let alone used one, it did get me thinking about the weight and size.

    >

    > We don't take these anchors everywhere. Well maybe the Fiddlestix. It doesn't play in certain areas that well and is weight that can be saved in trade routes. It is invaluable on explorations in Escalante, Glen Canyon and some other places and in any of the many places bolts are now illegal. I sleep so much better than before, tackling the unknown. Not sure how we had the nerve to drop some of these canyons before we had these tools.

    >

    > We normally carry both the sandtrap and the aguanchor in one potshot. Fits inside quite nicely and packs. For kicks, I added the fiddlestick to the package and weighed it. Including the rapides attached to the anchors that make it "ready for use," it came in at about 3 lb 6 ozs. for everything including the potshot.

    >

    > I grabbed other gear to see what weighs about the same. A 110 foot, 9mm rope WITHOUT the rope bag is comparable. And the anchor package packs much smaller than the rope. It is hardly the cumbersome deal some skeptics have speculated it to be.

    >

    > Both Shane and Cabe have said the watertrap is sure to kill someone. This is unlikely as there is only a hand full of them in use and there are no plans for any more to be made. The sharing of the devise was about "sharing the possible", not proposing it become standard. If it were to spark ideas among innovators, then other methods will be developed. Throw the seeds and see what happens.

    >

    > Great credit is due Jenny West for conceiving the idea, then designing the devise, then building half a dozen of them, testing the various one's she designed and built, modifying them, then field testing them in a safe fashion. Kudos. A fully functional and visionary prototype that was clearly the best option on several occasions.

    >

    > There were a major rainstorm in both the middle of September and one in the middle of October this fall. The aguanchor got most of it use after these storms, when so many anchor options were under water. This is a valid niche for the tool. I am less nervous about canyoneering after storms now.

    >

    > Finally a short tale. On a canyon out on the Glen, that we made a first modern descent on, the next to last rap, is a 25 foot overhanging Drop. We fiddlesticked a log the first time. The 2nd time we went, the log had been washed away, but a sandtrap had perfect geometry. The 3rd time we visited the place was after the October storm and this spot was 3 feet deep in water. You know what we did.

    >

    > The same spot, three different trips, three different solutions, due to changing conditions. These systems have been called clunky and heavy handed. Yet nothing was left. No rocks were farmed, stacked or buried. The sand and water used stayed pretty much where is was gotten, at the top of the anchor. Pretty nifty if you ask me.

    >

    > While caution is advised during the "learning curve" with these tools, it is unquestioned by those who have SEEN these tools in use, that it is very real steps taken to the "leave no trace" ethic.

    > Ram

    >

    > --- In Yahoo Canyons Group, "RAM" <adkramoo@> wrote:

    >





    here is a photo collection of the application of the Aguanchor





    https://picasaweb.google.com/aramv14/WatertrapAnchorApplied?authkey=Gv1sRgCN_67-GPlraAyAE





    Then a demo





    https://picasaweb.google.com/aramv14/WaterBagVideo#5477484498946189938





    What the spot looked like in lower water 5 months earlier. This picture and the next 7


    https://picasaweb.google.com/aramv14/Rhapsody42412#5737372194377659874





    Jenny the inventor of the Auganchor and her visual how to build one, picture book


    http://www.flickr.com/photos/carverat297/sets/72157628062414488/




    >
  3. rich_rudow

    rich_rudow Guest

    Ram, THAT is really neat! Hats off to the folks working on innovations to make this sport better. Thanks for sharing.

    Rich

    P.S. your wetsuit didn't have any holes. I almost didn't recognize you! :)



    --- In Yahoo Canyons Group, "RAM" <adkramoo@...> wrote:
    Wanna see something pretty cool?
    This was the very first test and use of the Aguanchor (May 2011) and the only footage of how it looks when it empties. Several important improvements have been made to the device since then.
    1- The yellow plastic cord, which takes the PVC sealing device, is now sewn into the fabric, making for a more secure fastening
    2-Webbing has been added to the pull side, in a "Y" shape with an end going to the opposite corner of where the water spills out. that end of the webbing slightly longer. The result is the pipe pulls off, the water starts to empty and THEN a second later the back side of the trap pulls up in the air, emptying the water more effectively so that the trap is almost always empty of water before coming over the drop.
    3-You will note some brown leather cloth as part of the system. It has a hole on each side of it and the rope fits through. It is used for lightweight groove protection. A small piece of garden hose, with some 8mm rope through it is also a tool we use for this. It should be noted, as is obvious from the video, the Aguanchor is very low friction when being pulled. One must be much more vigilant about friction with the sandtrap. Both these tool accomplish that
    http://vimeo.com/53952364



    > --- In Yahoo Canyons Group, "RAM" <adkramoo@> wrote:

    I have heard some say that the use of sandtraps, aguanchors and fiddlestix are heavy and cumbersome solutions to rappelling. That they would never carry all that extra weight. While the folks that said these things have never seen these tools, let alone used one, it did get me thinking about the weight and size.

    We don't take these anchors everywhere. Well maybe the Fiddlestix. It doesn't play in certain areas that well and is weight that can be saved in trade routes. It is invaluable on explorations in Escalante, Glen Canyon and some other places and in any of the many places bolts are now illegal. I sleep so much better than before, tackling the unknown. Not sure how we had the nerve to drop some of these canyons before we had these tools.

    We normally carry both the sandtrap and the aguanchor in one potshot. Fits inside quite nicely and packs. For kicks, I added the fiddlestick to the package and weighed it. Including the rapides attached to the anchors that make it "ready for use," it came in at about 3 lb 6 ozs. for everything including the potshot.

    I grabbed other gear to see what weighs about the same. A 110 foot, 9mm rope WITHOUT the rope bag is comparable. And the anchor package packs much smaller than the rope. It is hardly the cumbersome deal some skeptics have speculated it to be.

    Both Shane and Cabe have said the watertrap is sure to kill someone. This is unlikely as there is only a hand full of them in use and there are no plans for any more to be made. The sharing of the devise was about "sharing the possible", not proposing it become standard. If it were to spark ideas among innovators, then other methods will be developed. Throw the seeds and see what happens.

    Great credit is due Jenny West for conceiving the idea, then designing the devise, then building half a dozen of them, testing the various one's she designed and built, modifying them, then field testing them in a safe fashion. Kudos. A fully functional and visionary prototype that was clearly the best option on several occasions.

    There were a major rainstorm in both the middle of September and one in the middle of October this fall. The aguanchor got most of it use after these storms, when so many anchor options were under water. This is a valid niche for the tool. I am less nervous about canyoneering after storms now.

    Finally a short tale. On a canyon out on the Glen, that we made a first modern descent on, the next to last rap, is a 25 foot overhanging Drop. We fiddlesticked a log the first time. The 2nd time we went, the log had been washed away, but a sandtrap had perfect geometry. The 3rd time we visited the place was after the October storm and this spot was 3 feet deep in water. You know what we did.

    The same spot, three different trips, three different solutions, due to changing conditions. These systems have been called clunky and heavy handed. Yet nothing was left. No rocks were farmed, stacked or buried. The sand and water used stayed pretty much where is was gotten, at the top of the anchor. Pretty nifty if you ask me.

    While caution is advised during the "learning curve" with these tools, it is unquestioned by those who have SEEN these tools in use, that it is very real steps taken to the "leave no trace" ethic.
    Ram

    --- In Yahoo Canyons Group, "RAM" <adkramoo@> wrote:



    here is a photo collection of the application of the Aguanchor


    <a href="https://picasaweb.google.com/aramv14/WatertrapAnchorApplied?authkey=Gv1sRgCN_67-GPlraAyAE">https://picasaweb.google.com/aramv14/WatertrapAnchorApplied?authkey=Gv1sRgCN_67-GPlraAyAE</a


    > Then a demo


    <a href="https://picasaweb.google.com/aramv14/WaterBagVideo#5477484498946189938">https://picasaweb.google.com/aramv14/WaterBagVideo#5477484498946189938</a


    > What the spot looked like in lower water 5 months earlier. This picture and the next 7
    > <a href="https://picasaweb.google.com/aramv14/Rhapsody42412#5737372194377659874">https://picasaweb.google.com/aramv14/Rhapsody42412#5737372194377659874</a


    > Jenny the inventor of the Auganchor and her visual how to build one, picture book
    > http://www.flickr.com/photos/carverat297/sets/72157628062414488/


    >
  4. TOO COOL!

    GZ

  5. aj.outdoors

    aj.outdoors Guest

    Cool video. Thanks!

    For #2, is the webbing stitched to the trap? I understand the concept, that if you pull from the middle (the normal trap pull), it will hold some of the water as it's essentially creating a small compartment when you are pulling it down. So, for the water trap, the pull should be from the side without the opening.

    My thought was to stitch a small loop onto the sandtrap (both sides) which is where the pull will eventually happen from.

    I was planning to use the pull rope to attach to the water trap release (with a knot and using a rapide, much like I think Jenny does) and then continue that pull cord to the other side of the trap and put a biner or rapide to attach to the loop on the sand trap (again, on the opposite side of the water outlet.)

    So, in essence, when you pull the pull cord; it will release the pvc and let the water drain out some, and then when you pull more, it will grab the other corner of the sand trap and pull that, which should spill out the rest of the contents.

    Thoughts? (I'll be making my version over the Xmas season, so definitely willing to listen to ideas...) Note: I was initially thinking of attaching the loop to the Water Trap, but if the water didn't drain out all the way, I didn't want to add that stress to pulling the Water Trap bag. I'd rather crank on the Sand Trap...



    Thanks for any info! A.J.

    --- In Yahoo Canyons Group, "RAM" <adkramoo@...> wrote:
    Wanna see something pretty cool?
    This was the very first test and use of the Aguanchor (May 2011) and the only footage of how it looks when it empties. Several important improvements have been made to the device since then.
    1- The yellow plastic cord, which takes the PVC sealing device, is now sewn into the fabric, making for a more secure fastening
    2-Webbing has been added to the pull side, in a "Y" shape with an end going to the opposite corner of where the water spills out. that end of the webbing slightly longer. The result is the pipe pulls off, the water starts to empty and THEN a second later the back side of the trap pulls up in the air, emptying the water more effectively so that the trap is almost always empty of water before coming over the drop.
    3-You will note some brown leather cloth as part of the system. It has a hole on each side of it and the rope fits through. It is used for lightweight groove protection. A small piece of garden hose, with some 8mm rope through it is also a tool we use for this. It should be noted, as is obvious from the video, the Aguanchor is very low friction when being pulled. One must be much more vigilant about friction with the sandtrap. Both these tool accomplish that
    http://vimeo.com/53952364



    > --- In Yahoo Canyons Group, "RAM" <adkramoo@> wrote:

    I have heard some say that the use of sandtraps, aguanchors and fiddlestix are heavy and cumbersome solutions to rappelling. That they would never carry all that extra weight. While the folks that said these things have never seen these tools, let alone used one, it did get me thinking about the weight and size.

    We don't take these anchors everywhere. Well maybe the Fiddlestix. It doesn't play in certain areas that well and is weight that can be saved in trade routes. It is invaluable on explorations in Escalante, Glen Canyon and some other places and in any of the many places bolts are now illegal. I sleep so much better than before, tackling the unknown. Not sure how we had the nerve to drop some of these canyons before we had these tools.

    We normally carry both the sandtrap and the aguanchor in one potshot. Fits inside quite nicely and packs. For kicks, I added the fiddlestick to the package and weighed it. Including the rapides attached to the anchors that make it "ready for use," it came in at about 3 lb 6 ozs. for everything including the potshot.

    I grabbed other gear to see what weighs about the same. A 110 foot, 9mm rope WITHOUT the rope bag is comparable. And the anchor package packs much smaller than the rope. It is hardly the cumbersome deal some skeptics have speculated it to be.

    Both Shane and Cabe have said the watertrap is sure to kill someone. This is unlikely as there is only a hand full of them in use and there are no plans for any more to be made. The sharing of the devise was about "sharing the possible", not proposing it become standard. If it were to spark ideas among innovators, then other methods will be developed. Throw the seeds and see what happens.

    Great credit is due Jenny West for conceiving the idea, then designing the devise, then building half a dozen of them, testing the various one's she designed and built, modifying them, then field testing them in a safe fashion. Kudos. A fully functional and visionary prototype that was clearly the best option on several occasions.

    There were a major rainstorm in both the middle of September and one in the middle of October this fall. The aguanchor got most of it use after these storms, when so many anchor options were under water. This is a valid niche for the tool. I am less nervous about canyoneering after storms now.

    Finally a short tale. On a canyon out on the Glen, that we made a first modern descent on, the next to last rap, is a 25 foot overhanging Drop. We fiddlesticked a log the first time. The 2nd time we went, the log had been washed away, but a sandtrap had perfect geometry. The 3rd time we visited the place was after the October storm and this spot was 3 feet deep in water. You know what we did.

    The same spot, three different trips, three different solutions, due to changing conditions. These systems have been called clunky and heavy handed. Yet nothing was left. No rocks were farmed, stacked or buried. The sand and water used stayed pretty much where is was gotten, at the top of the anchor. Pretty nifty if you ask me.

    While caution is advised during the "learning curve" with these tools, it is unquestioned by those who have SEEN these tools in use, that it is very real steps taken to the "leave no trace" ethic.
    Ram

    --- In Yahoo Canyons Group, "RAM" <adkramoo@> wrote:



    here is a photo collection of the application of the Aguanchor


    <a href="https://picasaweb.google.com/aramv14/WatertrapAnchorApplied?authkey=Gv1sRgCN_67-GPlraAyAE">https://picasaweb.google.com/aramv14/WatertrapAnchorApplied?authkey=Gv1sRgCN_67-GPlraAyAE</a


    > Then a demo


    <a href="https://picasaweb.google.com/aramv14/WaterBagVideo#5477484498946189938">https://picasaweb.google.com/aramv14/WaterBagVideo#5477484498946189938</a


    > What the spot looked like in lower water 5 months earlier. This picture and the next 7
    > <a href="https://picasaweb.google.com/aramv14/Rhapsody42412#5737372194377659874">https://picasaweb.google.com/aramv14/Rhapsody42412#5737372194377659874</a


    > Jenny the inventor of the Auganchor and her visual how to build one, picture book
    > http://www.flickr.com/photos/carverat297/sets/72157628062414488/


    >
Similar Threads: ViIDEO -Aquanchor-
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Archives - Yahoo Canyons Group ViIDEO -Aquanchor- it being used, how it works and how it was b Dec 3, 2012
Archives - Yahoo Canyons Group VIDEO -Aquanchor- it being used, how it works and how it was built. Dec 3, 2012