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sandthrax development- the sign

Discussion in 'Archives - Yahoo Canyons Group' started by rick thompson, May 30, 2008.

  1. I for one, am sorry to see the further development of Sandthrax by the addition of the sign, at all, regardless of what it says. It will inevitably lead to increased visitation, with more use and abuse.

    That said, I have two lines of thought, one, there is an interpretative display going in down at Hog Springs, up on the site of the old loo. That is a more suitable place for extended commentary about the geology of the area, and perhaps some desert use ethics, though hopefully using agency materials, not zioncentric or editorial commentary lifted from a private website.

    Secondly, in as much as this sign effectively announces the presence of Sandthrax as a camp site, the sign information should be brief, direct and limited to campsite specific information, it is a sign, not a pamphlet. Even the canyoneering info section (blue, below) is a bit much, but this should be it, for length.



    POINTS OF CONTACT

    EMERGENCY PHONE NUMBERS 24 Hour Emergency Operator ----------------- Call 911 Utah State Highway Patrol --------- (435) 896-6471

    United States Department of Interior Bureau of Land Management

    Richfield Field Office Utah State Office 50 East, 900 North 440 West 200 South, Suite 500 Richfield, UT 84701 Salt lake City, UT 84101 (435) 896-1500 (801) 539- 4000

    United States Department of the Interior National Park Service Lake Powell National Recreation Area Bullfrog Visitor Center (435) 684-7420

    Garfield County Sheriff (435) 676-2678

    IMPORTANT NOTE: There is at best very limited cellular or satellite telephone coverage in this area. The nearest public telephones are located in Hite, 25 miles south on Utah Highway 95, and Bullfrog on Lake Powell, 40 miles west on Utah Highway 276 or at the community of Hanksville, located 60 miles north on Utah Highway 95.

    GENERAL INFORMATION

    Be careful when camping or hiking in dry washes and slot canyons. Even when the skies are blue above, flash floods can come down dry washes. Remember that water can travel many miles down drainages.

    Respect your pets and leave them at home. If you MUST bring them here, please pick up after them.

    Respect the desert. Tread lightly when traveling (don't leave vehicle tracks off trails) and leave no trace of your camping. Choose a spot that is already an established campsite, or that will show zero to very little impact from your stay. Bring your own wood. Use existing fire pits. Help keep the Canyon Country clean by taking your trash home and picking up after the less aware. Protect and conserve scarce water sources for wildlife by not polluting or bathing in them. Allow space for wildlife by maintaining your distance, and leave historic sites, rock art, ruins, and artifacts untouched for the future.

    Restrooms Please use the Hog Spring Picnic Area Toilet, located 4.9 miles south on Highway 95 or else a self contained carry out human waste unit, such as river runners use, not the local bushes.

    Canyoneering Information

    ALWAYS...Know before you go: Carry lots of water and high energy foods. Take two large bottles and a reserve supply in a water bladder or other container. Eating at intervals provides an opportunity to rest and the energy needed to complete the trail. During the hotter months, you should carry at least 1 gallon of water per day. Avoid drinking untreated water unless your life depends on it. Stay found.

    Search and Rescue operations in many places in Utah take a lot of time. Areas are very remote and the landscape can be very unforgiving. The high costs of rescue operations are typically the responsibility of the rescued party. If you are lost, do not continue on in hopes of finding your way. Retrace your route back toward the trailhead until you pick up the trail or find someone who knows the area. If you cannot retrace your route, stay put, conserve energy and water, make yourself visible and await rescue.

    Carry maps and use them to track your position. Great trail maps and guidebooks are available at many BLM, National Parke Service and National Forest Service Offices, bookstores, and other locations in local towns. There are some great web sites as well, such as the American Canyoneering Association (ACA). Check the alignment of the route and key junctions. Never try to cut cross-country to shorten a trail, and never enter a wash or slot canyon that you know nothing about. If you have one, use a GPS unit.

    Be prepared in case of emergency. Don't venture into remote areas with nothing but a t-shirt and shorts. Carry a windbreaker, sunscreen, sunglasses, maps, matches or lighter, repair kit, first-aid kit, and extra food, water and clothing. Travel with someone else and stay together in case of problems. Discuss your situation calmly and make a plan to improve it. Let someone know of your plans.

    ATTENTION ALL USERS Your comments regarding the present and future use of your public lands are encouraged. For more information, contact the Bureau of Land Management, Richfield Field Office, 150 E., 900 N., Richfield, UT. (435) 896-1500.

    THANK YOU FOR YOUR COOPERATION

    rick
  2. Mike Dallin

    Mike Dallin Guest

    Rick's got a point - is the BLM sign the place to espouse canyoneering ethics, particularly if those ethics aren't codified by a specific BLM regulation? Could be a little too much bias. Hmmm, I'm leaning toward leaving that to the guidebook authors.

    The crypto picture should stay, though.

    M

    -----Original Message----- From: Yahoo Canyons Group [mailto:Yahoo Canyons Group] On Behalf Of rick thompson Sent: Friday, May 30, 2008 12:09 PM To: Yahoo Canyons Group Subject: [from Canyons Group] sandthrax development- the sign

    I for one, am sorry to see the further development of Sandthrax by the addition of the sign, at all, regardless of what it says. It will inevitably lead to increased visitation, with more use and abuse.

    That said, I have two lines of thought, one, there is an interpretative display going in down at Hog Springs, up on the site of the old loo. That is a more suitable place for extended commentary about the geology of the area, and perhaps some desert use ethics, though hopefully using agency materials, not zioncentric or editorial commentary lifted from a private website.

    Secondly, in as much as this sign effectively announces the presence of Sandthrax as a camp site, the sign information should be brief, direct and limited to campsite specific information, it is a sign, not a pamphlet. Even the canyoneering info section (blue, below) is a bit much, but this should be it, for length.



    POINTS OF CONTACT

    EMERGENCY PHONE NUMBERS 24 Hour Emergency Operator ----------------- Call 911 Utah State Highway Patrol --------- (435) 896-6471

    United States Department of Interior Bureau of Land Management

    Richfield Field Office Utah State Office 50 East, 900 North 440 West 200 South, Suite 500 Richfield, UT 84701 Salt lake City, UT 84101 (435) 896-1500 (801) 539- 4000

    United States Department of the Interior National Park Service Lake Powell National Recreation Area Bullfrog Visitor Center (435) 684-7420

    Garfield County Sheriff (435) 676-2678

    IMPORTANT NOTE: There is at best very limited cellular or satellite telephone coverage in this area. The nearest public telephones are located in Hite, 25 miles south on Utah Highway 95, and Bullfrog on Lake Powell, 40 miles west on Utah Highway 276 or at the community of Hanksville, located 60 miles north on Utah Highway 95.

    GENERAL INFORMATION

    Be careful when camping or hiking in dry washes and slot canyons. Even when the skies are blue above, flash floods can come down dry washes. Remember that water can travel many miles down drainages.

    Respect your pets and leave them at home. If you MUST bring them here, please pick up after them.

    Respect the desert. Tread lightly when traveling (don't leave vehicle tracks off trails) and leave no trace of your camping. Choose a spot that is already an established campsite, or that will show zero to very little impact from your stay. Bring your own wood. Use existing fire pits. Help keep the Canyon Country clean by taking your trash home and picking up after the less aware. Protect and conserve scarce water sources for wildlife by not polluting or bathing in them. Allow space for wildlife by maintaining your distance, and leave historic sites, rock art, ruins, and artifacts untouched for the future.

    Restrooms Please use the Hog Spring Picnic Area Toilet, located 4.9 miles south on Highway 95 or else a self contained carry out human waste unit, such as river runners use, not the local bushes.

    Canyoneering Information

    ALWAYS...Know before you go: Carry lots of water and high energy foods. Take two large bottles and a reserve supply in a water bladder or other container. Eating at intervals provides an opportunity to rest and the energy needed to complete the trail. During the hotter months, you should carry at least 1 gallon of water per day. Avoid drinking untreated water unless your life depends on it. Stay found.

    Search and Rescue operations in many places in Utah take a lot of time. Areas are very remote and the landscape can be very unforgiving. The high costs of rescue operations are typically the responsibility of the rescued party. If you are lost, do not continue on in hopes of finding your way. Retrace your route back toward the trailhead until you pick up the trail or find someone who knows the area. If you cannot retrace your route, stay put, conserve energy and water, make yourself visible and await rescue.

    Carry maps and use them to track your position. Great trail maps and guidebooks are available at many BLM, National Parke Service and National Forest Service Offices, bookstores, and other locations in local towns. There are some great web sites as well, such as the American Canyoneering Association (ACA). Check the alignment of the route and key junctions. Never try to cut cross-country to shorten a trail, and never enter a wash or slot canyon that you know nothing about. If you have one, use a GPS unit.

    Be prepared in case of emergency. Don't venture into remote areas with nothing but a t-shirt and shorts. Carry a windbreaker, sunscreen, sunglasses, maps, matches or lighter, repair kit, first-aid kit, and extra food, water and clothing. Travel with someone else and stay together in case of problems. Discuss your situation calmly and make a plan to improve it. Let someone know of your plans.

    ATTENTION ALL USERS Your comments regarding the present and future use of your public lands are encouraged. For more information, contact the Bureau of Land Management, Richfield Field Office, 150 E., 900 N., Richfield, UT. (435) 896-1500.

    THANK YOU FOR YOUR COOPERATION

    rick





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  3. adkramoo

    adkramoo Guest

    --- In Yahoo Canyons Group, "Mike Dallin" <mike_dallin@...> wrote: > M

    More from Tim in response to your comments.

    OK, whoever said lets bag my text on crypto and use the NPS sign: Absolutely Right. Done. I'll get some.

    BLM does have some climbing policy (Instruction Memos for fixed anchors ion Wilderness Areas, the Interim management Policy -IMP, for Wildernesss Study Areas, etc), and encourages the use of similar practices as your ethics through its Leave no Tace and Tread Lightly national strategies. I'm one of its program teachers. We have some handouts specific to Canyoneering and I think anything you would say would probably be consistent with BLM policy. (everything printable, that is). thats why I used Toms Ethic page in my draft. It fits.

    Regarding "M" comment - does he/she have any photos or icons which you would use instead of text? I can do drafts with red slashes through them...

    As I understand the main concept you want is not to attract additional people to the site, just to give present users (YOU) and anyone who stumbles into it relevant info. I agree for BLM. (I think of this kiosk as being one of your friends waiting there to help out even though you couldn't make the trip. Just remember the first time you went there and what you should have known and thats what we'll put on it.)

    BLM has 4 levels of recreational sites, based on infrastructure improvements and only charges fees on level 4 developed sites, usually because of things like potable water systems restrooms, and/or grabage collection. Hog Springs doesn't even qualify for fees and I want to be out in the 2.5 million acres I manage, not driving from some little site to site like some dog. Developed facilities are for the Parkies. I only build the minnimum I have to and where and when its needed.

    I'm out of the office all next week. so'll try to touch base week after next. Great working for you - most people don't have a positive attitude when you say "I'm from BLM".
  4. Mike Dallin

    Mike Dallin Guest

    > To: Yahoo Canyons Group
    From: adkramoo@aol.com Subject: Re: [from Canyons Group] sandthrax development- the sign
    We have some handouts specific to Canyoneering and I > think anything you would say would probably be consistent with BLM > policy.

    This would be interesting to read. Any chance of getting an electronic copy posted up?

    > Regarding "M" comment - does he/she have any photos or icons which you > would use instead of text? I can do drafts with red slashes through > them...

    I don't have any good ones that spring to mind, but I'll look. I'd bet Hank, Rich or Tom would have plenty. Maybe Smilin' Brian Cabe. Photo contest? I hear the rope grooves in Tier Drop are really bad, perhaps someone can go there and snap a shot.

    What's needed:

    Picture of a bolt Picture of rope groove damage Picture of graffiti petroglyphs (didn't someone post photos of some in Lep a while back?)

    Hank posted these a while back:

    http://ph.groups.yahoo.com/group/canyons/photos/browse/8a7a

    M

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