Send us a suggestion!

Sandthrax Cam Sign

Discussion in 'Archives - Yahoo Canyons Group' started by davewyo1, May 23, 2008.

  1. davewyo1

    davewyo1 Guest

    A new information board/kiosk has sprouted up at teh entrance to the Sandthrax Campsite. Nothing posted on it yet, but the rules will be coming... Dave
  2. gbrandthart

    gbrandthart Guest

    Dave,

    Is this a BLM style kiosk? Metal or wood?

    Brandt

    --- In Yahoo Canyons Group, "davewyo1" <davewyo1@...> wrote:
    A new information board/kiosk has sprouted up at teh entrance to the > Sandthrax Campsite. Nothing posted on it yet, but the rules will be > coming... > Dave >
  3. davewyo1

    davewyo1 Guest

    Yes, it looks BLM to me. It's pressure-treated wood with a little roof over the signboard. Dave --- In Yahoo Canyons Group, "gbrandthart" <gbrandthart@...> wrote:
    Dave,
    Is this a BLM style kiosk? Metal or wood?
    Brandt
    > --- In Yahoo Canyons Group, "davewyo1" <davewyo1@> wrote:

    A new information board/kiosk has sprouted up at teh entrance to the
    Sandthrax Campsite. Nothing posted on it yet, but the rules will be
    coming...
    Dave
    >
  4. A.J.

    A.J. Guest

    Saw that over the weekend too. Agree that it looks like BLM, and agree with the description Dave gave. Interested to see what's coming. No info on it as of Monday...

    --- In Yahoo Canyons Group, "davewyo1" <davewyo1@...> wrote:
    Yes, it looks BLM to me. It's pressure-treated wood with a little roof > over the signboard. > Dave > --- In Yahoo Canyons Group, "gbrandthart" <gbrandthart@> wrote:

    Dave,

    Is this a BLM style kiosk? Metal or wood?

    Brandt


    --- In Yahoo Canyons Group, "davewyo1" <davewyo1@> wrote:


    A new information board/kiosk has sprouted up at teh entrance to > the
    > Sandthrax Campsite. Nothing posted on it yet, but the rules will be
    > coming...
    > Dave
  5. adkramoo

    adkramoo Guest

    --- In Yahoo Canyons Group, "davewyo1" <davewyo1@...> wrote: > A new information board/kiosk has sprouted up at teh entrance to the > Sandthrax Campsite. Nothing posted on it yet, but the rules will be > coming... > Dave

    Just off the phone with the BLM and Tim, the fella who put up the sign. This you will find refreshing.......

    He said that it was on his to do list to contact our community today. He was privy to the conversation that occurred on this site last winter.

    He said, and I quote "I have the sign up, now what do you (the community) want on it? For a change, we are going to serve the user group, who has taken possession and care of the site. What do you want?"

    Well, no one elected me, but I do have their ear and I remember some of the consensus that our group agreed on when this was last discussed, so I told him that a few things come to mind that I think were agreed on, but that it had to be run through the community again, to be sure I got it right, that thoughts of others haven't changed and that those that didn't add input last time still can now.......

    What I remember and mentioned

    1-No gathering firewood....please bring your own 2-Toilet facilities 4.9 miles down route 95 at Hog Springs. Please use them!~ 3-Park only on established roads and pull outs 4-Minimize fire pits, spread ashes and yada yada

    The big 3 for signs of this nature are 1-Site info 2-User info 3-Saftey info, who to call etc.

    He wanted to know if we wanted maps on the kiosk? He loves the stuff on Tom's site. I told him that different opinions will likely come out on that issue. Fire away, everyone. He suggested, that if we wished to have maps, info or even if not, that we are free to design and use a logo of our choice etc.. He insisted that the board was ours.

    He mentioned a picnic table.....I told him, that I recall, there was some difference of opinion here, but that maybe most (?) thought any BLM property brought in would mean more regulation and maintanence and that our community will lose some of its control of the site. He thought my premise sound, but I told him that I would reintroduce the topic for discussion.

    The topic of a toilet came up and I expressed the same concerns about the BLM then having to be a regular visitor to the site and all that means. It was also discussed that there is very little area above the formal riparian for said toilet. Only the sections on the hill above the main part of the site. It was discussed, that someday it may be necessary, but for now....he would leave it up to us.

    I expressed that our community, loose as it is, is self policing and that the kiosk will be particularly helpful with others who stumble upon and use the site. Those who aren't guided by the info on the websites and blogs etc.

    He was very impressed, but not surprised that the word buzzed through the community, about the sign within a day or so of it being erected. He took that to be further proof that the place is "ours."

    Alright, I stepped over some boundaries in my mind, discussing this with the BLM to the extent that I did, but wanted a benchmark and to impress that the issues matter to us and thank him for his willingness to serve us for a change. What I said is true. He knows that everything I said is my opinion on what I though consensus was from before. Nothing is decided. Go forth and decide for ourselves now. A rare opportunity these days. Ram
  6. A.J.

    A.J. Guest

    Nice to see the BLM interested in informing the public, and accepting suggestions for the sign. My opinion is to stick with campsite rules. No canyon info...

    > 1-No gathering firewood....please bring your own > 2-Toilet facilities 4.9 miles down route 95 at Hog Springs. Please use > them!~ > 3-Park only on established roads and pull outs > 4-Minimize fire pits, spread ashes and yada yada

    I like these to minimize the impacts. Also, only camp in existing camp areas...

    Another blurb on Crypto soil wouldn't be a bad idea either.

    > The big 3 for signs of this nature are > 1-Site info > 2-User info > 3-Saftey info, who to call etc.

    1 and 2 are contained enough in the list above. #3 isn't a bad idea either; would be good to have the safety phone numbers, and let them know the nearest cell signal is in Hanksville.

    I don't think adding canyon info is a good idea, then folks who are driving by might want to head up into the canyons; and might get themselves into trouble...

    Take care, A.J.

    --- In Yahoo Canyons Group, "adkramoo" <adkramoo@...> wrote:
    --- In Yahoo Canyons Group, "davewyo1" <davewyo1@> wrote:
    A new information board/kiosk has sprouted up at teh entrance to the
    Sandthrax Campsite. Nothing posted on it yet, but the rules will be
    coming...
    Dave
    Just off the phone with the BLM and Tim, the fella who put up the > sign. This you will find refreshing.......
    He said that it was on his to do list to contact our community today. > He was privy to the conversation that occurred on this site last winter.
    He said, and I quote "I have the sign up, now what do you (the > community) want on it? For a change, we are going to serve the user > group, who has taken possession and care of the site. What do you want?"
    Well, no one elected me, but I do have their ear and I remember some > of the consensus that our group agreed on when this was last > discussed, so I told him that a few things come to mind that I think > were agreed on, but that it had to be run through the community again, > to be sure I got it right, that thoughts of others haven't changed and > that those that didn't add input last time still can now.......
    What I remember and mentioned
    1-No gathering firewood....please bring your own > 2-Toilet facilities 4.9 miles down route 95 at Hog Springs. Please use > them!~ > 3-Park only on established roads and pull outs > 4-Minimize fire pits, spread ashes and yada yada
    The big 3 for signs of this nature are > 1-Site info > 2-User info > 3-Saftey info, who to call etc.
    He wanted to know if we wanted maps on the kiosk? > He loves the stuff on Tom's site. I told him that different opinions > will likely come out on that issue. Fire away, everyone. > He suggested, that if we wished to have maps, info or even if not, > that we are free to design and use a logo of our choice etc.. He > insisted that the board was ours.
    He mentioned a picnic table.....I told him, that I recall, there was > some difference of opinion here, but that maybe most (?) thought any > BLM property brought in would mean more regulation and maintanence and > that our community will lose some of its control of the site. He > thought my premise sound, but I told him that I would reintroduce the > topic for discussion.
    The topic of a toilet came up and I expressed the same concerns about > the BLM then having to be a regular visitor to the site and all that > means. It was also discussed that there is very little area above the > formal riparian for said toilet. Only the sections on the hill above > the main part of the site. It was discussed, that someday it may be > necessary, but for now....he would leave it up to us.
    I expressed that our community, loose as it is, is self policing and > that the kiosk will be particularly helpful with others who stumble > upon and use the site. Those who aren't guided by the info on the > websites and blogs etc.
    He was very impressed, but not surprised that the word buzzed through > the community, about the sign within a day or so of it being erected. > He took that to be further proof that the place is "ours."
    Alright, I stepped over some boundaries in my mind, discussing this > with the BLM to the extent that I did, but wanted a benchmark and to > impress that the issues matter to us and thank him for his willingness > to serve us for a change. What I said is true. He knows that > everything I said is my opinion on what I though consensus was from > before. Nothing is decided. Go forth and decide for ourselves now. A > rare opportunity these days. > Ram >
  7. Rick Pratt

    Rick Pratt Guest

    --- In Yahoo Canyons Group, "A.J." <adventure_geek@...> wrote:

    > Nice to see the BLM interested in informing the public, and > accepting suggestions for the sign. My opinion is to stick with > campsite rules. No canyon info...
    > 1-No gathering firewood....please bring your own
    2-Toilet facilities 4.9 miles down route 95 at Hog Springs. Please > use
    them!~
    3-Park only on established roads and pull outs
    4-Minimize fire pits, spread ashes and yada yada

    I would like to suggest an alternative to "spreading ashes." We have camped in many campsites that have been used and overused and as great as fires are, the ashes are a nuisance. I hate to see black piles of ashes under bushes or trees near nice campsites or even in holes dug near by which tend to be exposed after a good rain.

    Our semi-regular practice is to bring heavy duty trash bags (compactor bags are great) and clean out (assuming they are cold) the "existing" ashes from the pit prior to adding our new contribution of ashes. A plastic box/bin is great for holding these but if you are careful, the bags (double them) will do the job until you get to a good place to dump them.

    The trash bin at Hog Springs is one option but since most ashes are organic we will sometimes dump them (if not too many busted bottles and bottle caps are included) in inconspicuous ditches far from camp. Ever been to a campsite that has been used for years and no one has cleaned the ashes? We have actually cleaned as much as four 30 gallon trash cans from some a campsite, but we knew we were going to leave our share when we left… so it seemed the right thing to do.

    Rick
  8. adkramoo

    adkramoo Guest

    Tim at the BLM sent me this menu of potential ideas for the sign. Time to comment if we want the control promised R



    POINTS OF CONTACT



    EMERGENCY PHONE NUMBERS 24 Hour Emergency Operator ----------------- Call 911 Utah State Highway Patrol --------- (435) 896-6471

    United States Department of Interior Bureau of Land Management

    Richfield Field Office Utah State Office 50 East, 900 North 440 West 200 South, Suite 500



    Richfield, UT 84701 Salt lake City, UT 84101 (435) 896-1500 (801) 539- 4000

    United States Department of the Interior National Park Service Lake Powell National Recreation Area Bullfrog Visitor Center (435) 684-7420

    Garfield County

    Garfield County Sheriff (435) 676-2678

    IMPORTANT NOTE:

    There is at best very limited cellular or satellite telephone coverage in this area. The nearest public telephones are located in Hite, 25 miles south on Utah Highway 95, and Bullfrog on Lake Powell, 40 miles west on Utah Highway 276 or at the community of Hanksville, located 60 miles north on Utah Highway 95.

    Canyoneering Ethics



    Travelling in Technical climbing Canyons When actually in the canyons, we ask that people generally travel on slickrock or in washes that are refreshed on a regular basis. And sometimes not. We can and should minimize our impacts. Some pointers: 1. Stay in the Watercourse: traveling IN the watercourse tends to have zero impact – the watercourse is often slickrock or sand and gravel. Taking paths off to the side to avoid small drops has an enormous impact and should be avoided religiously. Figure out how to deal with obstacles directly, rather than running off into the woods any time a difficulty presents itself. We are Canyoneers, not rim-aneers. And, staying in the watercourse is more fun.. 2. Don't Bolt: Utah's canyons have quite a passel of bolts already and do not need more. If you come to a drop that you think needs a bolt anchor, look around, open your mind and figure it out. If the canyon is on this site, it is well-trodden and thousands have done it before without adding a bolt at that spot. Think. 3. Don't Leave Stuff: Slings and fixed ropes are litter, pure and simple. Leave only as much sling as is consistent with safe canyoneering. For example, you may think that leaving a rope fixed across the traverse at Zion's Mystery Springs is a public service – it is not. Parties can establish their own safety line across the 3rd class traverse if they wish. Lines left in place are litter and should be removed and packed out. 4. Watch Your Step: Pay attention to where you walk. Stay on established trails, or walk on zero-impact surfaces like slickrock or sand and gravel. When following social trails (trails made by the passage of people, rather than by deliberate trail building), stay on the main trail to minimize proliferation. Walk single file rather than side by side. When given the choice, follow the edge of the stream rather than taking a side-trail that climbs over a hill. 5. Social Impacts Count. Don't rain on other people's wilderness experience. Respect other parties right to solitude – give them space to do the canyon without you breathing down their neck. Invite faster parties to pass. Create separation between parties by speeding up or slowing down, or by taking a break to let the other party get a ways ahead. 6. Travel in Small Groups: Large groups tend to have significantly more physical impacts per person than small groups, and have a greater impact on other people's feeling of solitude. Limit yourself to parties of six or less. If need be, split into two groups and start an hour apart. In small groups, people tend to appreciate the canyon more. In large groups, they tend to appreciate each other. Nothing wrong with that, but there are more appropriate places for a party than in wilderness canyons. 7. Respect loose Rocks, wear a helmet: Most canyons are very rocky. Even the best climbers can get tired and make mistakes. Helmets can prevent or reduce the severity of head injuries. Medical professionals say that the average cost of treating a major head injury is over half a million dollars.



    Courtesy of American Canyoneering Association ACA) and Bureau of Land Management (BLM)

    GENERAL INFORMATION

    Be careful when camping or hiking in dry washes and slot canyons. Even when the skies are blue above, flash floods can come down dry washes. Remember that water can travel many miles down drainages.

    Respect Your pets. Do not leave your pet in the car when temperatures are above 65° F. Pets can die from heat exhaustion in a very short time. Leaving pets tied up outside your vehicle is also not a good idea. Pets often knock their water over and are left with no water until you come back. Temperatures during the summer months are often above 100° F.

    Respect the desert. Tread lightly when traveling (don't leave vehicle tracks off trails) and leave no trace of your camping. Choose a spot that is already an established campsite, or that will show zero to very little impact from your stay. Bring your own wood. Use existing fire pits. Help keep the Canyon Country clean by taking your trash home and picking up after the less aware. Protect and conserve scarce water sources for wildlife by not polluting or bathing in them. Allow space for wildlife by maintaining your distance, and leave historic sites, rock art, ruins, and artifacts untouched for the future.

    Cryptobiotic soil Cryptobiotic Soil is cool stuff, and important to the desert ecosystem. It forms a black, castle-like crust that is a conglomeration of algae, fungi and moss. It is an important barrier to direct erosion, and is one of the only things in the desert that fixes nitrogen, transforming the sand into soil. Huge expanses of Cryptosoil have been destroyed by running cattle out there, so the Crypto that persists is even more important to the ecosystem. Don't walk on it. Go a LONG way out of your way to avoid chewing up our friend the Crypto. The conscientious canyoneer chooses a path that avoids the Crypto as much as possible. Walk on slickrock when available, and stay in the micro-washes between patches of Crypto. Use established paths. If you have to walk ON the Crypto, put the smallest person in front, and have them take as big of steps as possible. Follow each other single-file, and step in the footsteps. Stepping on rocks, plants and logs is better than stepping on the Crypto. Put together a path that places as few footprints in the Crypto as possible. Restrooms Please use the Hog Spring Picnic Area Toilet, not the local bushes, if possible. The restroom is located 4.9 miles south on Highway 95. WELCOME TO THE NORTH WASH CANYONS

    ATTENTION ALL USERS

    The Public Lands administered by the Bureau of Land Management, Richfield Field Office, comprise an internationally recognized recreation destination. The Richfield Field Office manages approximately 2.1 million acres of public lands in central Utah. The extraordinarily scenic and diverse landscape, the presence of interesting cultural and paleontological resources, the vast expanses, and the opportunities for a wide range of recreational activities have made the area popular for those seeking outdoor experiences. Recreational opportunities range from casual sightseeing and hiking to more physically demanding activities such as mountain biking, canyoneering, and motorized travel. In general, the most visitors come during both spring and fall, with the spring season beginning in February and lasting through May, and the fall season running from September through November. Spring and fall visitors engage in the full range of recreation activities, including scenic driving, camping, hiking, mountain biking, canoeing and rafting, rock climbing, off-highway vehicle (OHV) and dirt bike riding, and horseback riding. Summer visitation is mainly associated with touring the nearby National Parks and Monuments (Capitol Reef NP, Grand Staircase/Escalante NM), Forests (Fish Lake NF and Dixie NF) and sightseeing in the Henry Mountains. Most of the land around the north of Lake Powell is exposed rock - countless square miles of multicolored sandstone and limestone strata, heavily eroded into many different forms. Many branched canyons cut deep into the layered rocks and join the lake or the Colorado River upstream. UT Highway 95 is the main highway through this region, though UT Highway 276 also provides some access and besides these two, several unpaved tracks lead into wilderness study areas.

    North Wash begins as a sandy creek in the desert beside the Henry Mountains and flows south, cutting through seven different sandstone strata representing 80 million years of history in a course of just 20 miles, and joins Lake Powell opposite Hite by which time the wash has formed quite an impressive gorge 1,200 feet deep. In the canyon itself there are many interesting tributaries in the lower course, in particular four exceedingly narrow slot canyons that join the northern end of the wash.

    This section of the canyon runs alongside US Highway 95 from a few miles north of the junction with UT Highway 276 all the way to Lake Powell, and starts to form the canyon just after the road junction, where the Navajo sandstone is first exposed. The four slot canyons are found on the northeast side between mileposts 27 and 29; the southwest side is sheerer and has no significant tributaries. Around mile 30 the Navajo is briefly replaced by crumbling ledges of the underlying Kayenta Formation, and then the wash deepens quickly as it cuts through the next layer, the cliff-forming Wingate sandstone. Several other more lengthy branches join here, named canyons being Butler, Stair, Marinus and Hog, but although colorful and worth investigation they are not especially narrow except for short sections in the upper ends where the Navajo layer reappears.

    Your comments regarding the present and future use of your public lands are encouraged. For more information, contact the Bureau of Land Management, Richfield Field Office, 150 E., 900 N., Richfield, UT. (435) 896-1500.

    THANK YOU FOR YOUR COOPERATION



    Canyoneering Information

    ALWAYS...Know before you go: Carry lots of water and high energy foods. Take two large bottles and a reserve supply in a water bladder or other container. Eating at intervals provides an opportunity to rest and the energy needed to complete the trail. During the hotter months, you should carry at least 1 gallon of water per day. Avoid drinking untreated water unless your life depends on it. Stay found. Search and Rescue operations in many places in Utah take a lot of time. Areas are very remote and the landscape can be very unforgiving. The high costs of rescue operations are typically the responsibility of the rescued party. If you are lost, do not continue on in hopes of finding your way. Retrace your route back toward the trailhead until you pick up the trail or find someone who knows the area. If you cannot retrace your route, stay put, conserve energy and water, make yourself visible and await rescue.

    Carry maps and use them to track your position. Great trail maps and guidebooks are available at many BLM, National Parke Service and National Forest Service Offices, bookstores, and other locations in local towns. There are some great web sites as well, such as the American Canyoneering Association (ACA). Check the alignment of the route and key junctions. Never try to cut cross-country to shorten a trail, and never enter a wash or slot canyon that you know nothing about. If you have one, use a GPS unit.

    Be prepared in case of emergency. Don't venture into remote areas with nothing but a t-shirt and shorts. Carry a windbreaker, sunscreen, sunglasses, maps, matches or lighter, repair kit, first-aid kit, and extra food, water and clothing. Travel with someone else and stay together in case of problems. Discuss your situation calmly and make a plan to improve it. Let someone know of your plans.



    photo by J. Bierk
  9. Tom Jones

    Tom Jones Guest

    --- In Yahoo Canyons Group, "adkramoo" <adkramoo@...> wrote:
    Tim at the BLM sent me this menu of potential ideas for the sign. > Time to comment if we want the control promised > R >

    Edited by Tom:

    POINTS OF CONTACT

    EMERGENCY PHONE NUMBERS 24 Hour Emergency Operator ----------------- Call 911 Utah State Highway Patrol --------- (435) 896-6471

    United States Department of Interior Bureau of Land Management Richfield Field Office 50 East, 900 North Richfield, UT 84701 (435) 896-1500

    Utah State BLM Office 440 West 200 South, Suite 500 Salt lake City, UT 84101 (801) 539- 4000

    United States Department of the Interior National Park Service Lake Powell National Recreation Area Bullfrog Visitor Center (435) 684-7420

    Garfield County Garfield County Sheriff (435) 676-2678

    IMPORTANT NOTE: There is at best very limited cellular or satellite telephone coverage in this area. The nearest public telephones are located in Hite, 25 miles south on Utah Highway 95, and Bullfrog on Lake Powell, 40 miles west on Utah Highway 276 or at the community of Hanksville, located 29 miles north on Utah Highway 95.

    Canyoneering Ethics

    Travelling in Technical Canyons

    Many canyons in this area are technical canyons that require ropes, equipment, information, experience and technique to traverse safely. If you do not have these things, please explore carefully, and make sure you can exit the canyon following the route that you entered.

    Please minimize your impacts to the landscape. Some pointers: 1. Stay in the Watercourse: traveling IN the watercourse tends to have zero impact – the watercourse is often slickrock or sand and gravel. Taking paths off to the side to avoid small drops has an enormous impact and should be avoided religiously. Figure out how to deal with obstacles directly, rather than running off into the desert anytime a difficulty presents itself. We are Canyoneers, not Rim-aneers. Plus - staying in the watercourse is more fun.. 2. Don't Bolt: Utah's canyons have quite a passel of bolts already and do not need more. If you come to a drop that you think needs a bolt anchor, look around, open your mind and figure it out. All the canyons in this area have been descended without bolts. 3. Don't Leave Trash: Slings and fixed ropes are litter, pure and simple. Leave only as much sling as is consistent with safe canyoneering. Ropes left in place are litter and should be removed and packed out. 4. Watch Your Step: Pay attention to where you walk. Stay on established trails, or walk on zero-impact surfaces like slickrock or sand and gravel. When following social trails (trails made by the passage of people, rather than by deliberate trail building), stay on the main trail to minimize proliferation. Walk single file rather than side by side. When given the choice, follow the edge of the stream rather than taking a side-trail that climbs over a hill. 5. Social Impacts Count. Don't rain on other people's wilderness experience. Respect other's right to solitude – give them space to do the canyon without you breathing down their necks. Invite faster parties to pass. Create separation between parties by speeding up or slowing down, or by taking a break to let the other party get a ways ahead. 6. Travel in Small Groups: Large groups tend to have significantly more physical impacts per person than small groups, and have a greater impact on other people's feeling of solitude. Limit yourself to parties of six or less. If need be, split into two groups and start an hour apart. In small groups, people tend to appreciate the canyon more. In large groups, they tend to appreciate each other. Nothing wrong with that, but there are more appropriate places for a party than in wilderness canyons. 7. Respect Loose Rocks, wear a helmet: Most canyons are very rocky. Even the best climbers can get tired and make mistakes. Helmets can prevent or reduce the severity of head injuries. Medical professionals say that the average cost of treating a major head injury is over half a million dollars.

    Courtesy of Bureau of Land Management (BLM)

    GENERAL INFORMATION

    Be careful when hiking in dry washes and slot canyons. Even when the skies are blue above, flash floods can come down dry washes. Remember that water can travel many miles down drainages. Do not camp in dry washes and slot canyons.

    Respect Your pets. Do not leave your pet in the car when temperatures are above 65° F. Pets can die from heat exhaustion in a very short time. Leaving pets tied up outside your vehicle is also not a good idea. Pets often knock their water over and are left with no water until you come back. Temperatures during the summer months are often above 100° F.

    Respect the desert. Tread lightly when traveling (don't leave vehicle tracks off trails) and leave no trace of your camping. Choose a spot that is already an established campsite, or that will show zero to very little impact from your stay. Bring your own wood. Use existing fire pits. Help keep the Canyon Country clean by taking your trash home and picking up after the less aware. Protect and conserve scarce water sources for wildlife by not polluting or bathing in them. Allow space for wildlife by maintaining your distance, and leave historic sites, rock art, ruins, and artifacts untouched for the future.

    Cryptobiotic soil Cryptobiotic Soil is cool stuff, and important to the desert ecosystem. It forms a black, castle-like crust that is a conglomeration of algae, fungi and moss. It is an important barrier to direct erosion, and is one of the only things in the desert that fixes nitrogen, transforming the sand into soil. Huge expanses of Cryptosoil have been destroyed by running cattle out here, so the Crypto that persists is even more important to the ecosystem.

    Don't walk on the Crypto. Go a LONG way out of your way to avoid chewing up our friend the Crypto. The conscientious canyoneer chooses a path that avoids the Crypto as much as possible. Walk on slickrock when available, and stay in the micro-washes between patches of Crypto. Use established paths. Follow each other single- file, and step in the footsteps. Stepping on rocks, plants and logs is better than stepping on the Crypto. Put together a path that places as few footprints in the Crypto as possible.

    Restrooms Please use the Hog Spring Picnic Area Toilet, not the local bushes, if possible. The restroom is located 4.9 miles south on Highway 95.

    WELCOME TO THE NORTH WASH CANYONS

    ATTENTION ALL USERS

    The Public Lands administered by the Bureau of Land Management, Richfield Field Office, comprise an internationally recognized recreation destination. The Richfield Field Office manages approximately 2.1 million acres of public lands in central Utah. The extraordinarily scenic and diverse landscape, the presence of interesting cultural and paleontological resources, the vast expanses, and the opportunities for a wide range of recreational activities have made the area popular for those seeking outdoor experiences. Recreational opportunities range from casual sightseeing and hiking to more physically demanding activities such as mountain biking, technical canyoneering, and motorized travel.

    Most visitors come during spring and fall, with the spring season beginning in February and lasting through May, and the fall season running from September through November. Spring and fall visitors engage in the full range of recreation activities, including scenic driving, camping, hiking, mountain biking, canoeing and rafting, rock climbing, off-highway vehicle (OHV) and dirt bike riding, and horseback riding. Summer visitation is mainly associated with touring the nearby National Parks and Monuments (Capitol Reef NP, Grand Staircase/Escalante NM), Forests (Fish Lake NF and Dixie NF) and sightseeing in the Henry Mountains.

    Most of the land around the north of Lake Powell is exposed rock - countless square miles of multicolored sandstone and limestone strata, heavily eroded into many different forms. Many branched canyons cut deep into the layered rocks and join the lake or the Colorado River upstream. UT Highway 95 is the main highway through this region, though UT Highway 276 also provides some access and besides these two, several unpaved tracks lead into wilderness study areas.

    North Wash begins as a sandy creek in the desert beside the Henry Mountains and flows south, cutting through seven different sandstone strata representing 80 million years of history in a course of just 20 miles, and joins Lake Powell opposite Hite by which time the wash has formed quite an impressive gorge 1,200 feet deep. In the canyon itself there are many interesting tributaries in the lower course, in particular four exceedingly narrow slot canyons that join the northern end of the wash.

    This section of the canyon runs alongside US Highway 95 from a few miles north of the junction with UT Highway 276 all the way to Lake Powell, and starts to form the canyon just after the road junction, where the Navajo sandstone is first exposed. The four slot canyons are found on the northeast side between mileposts 27 and 29; the southwest side is sheerer and has no significant tributaries. Around mile 30 the Navajo is briefly replaced by crumbling ledges of the underlying Kayenta Formation, and then the wash deepens quickly as it cuts through the next layer, the cliff-forming Wingate sandstone. Several other more lengthy branches join here, named canyons being Butler, Stair, Marinus and Hog, but although colorful and worth investigation they are not especially narrow except for short sections in the upper ends where the Navajo layer reappears.

    Your comments regarding the present and future use of your public lands are encouraged. For more information, contact the Bureau of Land Management, Richfield Field Office, 150 E., 900 N., Richfield, UT. (435) 896-1500.

    THANK YOU FOR YOUR COOPERATION

    Canyoneering Information

    ALWAYS...Know before you go: Carry lots of water and high energy foods. If hiking, take two large bottles and a reserve supply in a water bladder or other container. Eating at intervals provides an opportunity to rest and the energy needed to complete the trail. During the hotter months, you should drink at least 1 gallon of water per day. Avoid drinking untreated water unless your life depends on it.

    STAY FOUND! Carry maps and use them to track your position. Trail maps and guidebooks are available at many BLM, National Park Service and National Forest Service Offices, bookstores, and other locations in local towns. A great deal of information is available on the Internet. There are very few established, signed trails in this area. Follow your route carefully on your map. Never cut cross-country to shorten a trail, and never enter a wash or slot canyon that you know nothing about. If you have one, use a GPS unit.

    Stay found. Search and Rescue operations in many places in Utah take a long time. Areas are remote and the landscape can be very unforgiving. If you are lost, do not continue on in hopes of finding your way. Retrace your route back toward the trailhead until you pick up the trail or find someone who knows the area. If you cannot retrace your route, stay put, conserve energy and water, make yourself visible and await rescue.

    Be prepared in case of emergency. Don't venture into remote areas with nothing but a t-shirt and shorts. Carry a windbreaker, sunscreen, sunglasses, maps, matches or lighter, repair kit, first-aid kit, and extra food, water and clothing. Travel with someone else and stay together in case of problems. Discuss your situation calmly and make a plan to improve it. Let someone know of your plans.

    photo by J. Bierk

    (Tom)
  10. davewyo1

    davewyo1 Guest

  11. stefan

    stefan Guest

    thanks for posting the photos, dave. it's nice to be able to see it and where it's placed.



    i have to admit. it think it's really pretty super that the BLM is so engaging with the canyoneering community on the sandthrax camp. i must commend those who have reached out to the BLM on behalf of the community.

    well done and thanks!!



    regarding the information on the sign, there seems to be A LOT of it, which is a good thing. however, one suggestion i have is that certain key items should be highlighted, either with large text, bold, different color or whatever. mainly important items, so they don't get glossed over.

    one that stands out to me as highly important is related to the Hog Springs Run. this certainly should stand out. it'd be nice if it could suggestively hint what's most important for hog (#2)

    thanks!!

    stefan





    On May 29, 2008, at 9:00 PM, davewyo1 wrote:

    > I put up some photos of the sign: > http://ph.groups.yahoo.com/group/canyons/photos/browse/3455?c=mm
    Dave
  12. Before I comment I have a question. How will the sign be used? My comment It looks like a short and complete manual, my experience is ³manuals² are disregarded by unwary people.

    Larry the Pessimist Larry B Larry5925@embarqmail(dot) com



    On 5/29/08 8:44 PM, "Tom Jones" ratagonia@gmail.com> wrote:



    --- In Yahoo Canyons Group <mailto:canyons%40yahoogroups.com> , "adkramoo" > <adkramoo@...> wrote: >
    >
    Tim at the BLM sent me this menu of potential ideas for the sign. >
    Time to comment if we want the control promised >
    R >

    Edited by Tom:
    POINTS OF CONTACT
    EMERGENCY PHONE NUMBERS > 24 Hour Emergency Operator ----------------- Call 911 > Utah State Highway Patrol --------- (435) 896-6471
    United States Department of Interior > Bureau of Land Management > Richfield Field Office > 50 East, 900 North > Richfield, UT 84701 > (435) 896-1500
    Utah State BLM Office > 440 West 200 South, Suite 500 > Salt lake City, UT 84101 > (801) 539- 4000
    United States Department of the Interior > National Park Service > Lake Powell National Recreation Area > Bullfrog Visitor Center (435) 684-7420
    Garfield County > Garfield County Sheriff (435) 676-2678
    IMPORTANT NOTE: > There is at best very limited cellular or satellite telephone > coverage in this area. The nearest public telephones are located in > Hite, 25 miles south on Utah Highway 95, and Bullfrog on Lake > Powell, 40 miles west on Utah Highway 276 or at the community of > Hanksville, located 29 miles north on Utah Highway 95.
    Canyoneering Ethics
    Travelling in Technical Canyons
    Many canyons in this area are technical canyons that require ropes, > equipment, information, experience and technique to traverse > safely. If you do not have these things, please explore carefully, > and make sure you can exit the canyon following the route that you > entered.
    Please minimize your impacts to the landscape. Some pointers: > 1. Stay in the Watercourse: traveling IN the watercourse tends to > have zero impact – the watercourse is often slickrock or sand and > gravel. Taking paths off to the side to avoid small drops has an > enormous impact and should be avoided religiously. Figure out how to > deal with obstacles directly, rather than running off into the > desert anytime a difficulty presents itself. We are Canyoneers, not > Rim-aneers. Plus - staying in the watercourse is more fun.. > 2. Don't Bolt: Utah's canyons have quite a passel of bolts already > and do not need more. If you come to a drop that you think needs a > bolt anchor, look around, open your mind and figure it out. All the > canyons in this area have been descended without bolts. > 3. Don't Leave Trash: Slings and fixed ropes are litter, pure and > simple. Leave only as much sling as is consistent with safe > canyoneering. Ropes left in place are litter and should be removed > and packed out. > 4. Watch Your Step: Pay attention to where you walk. Stay on > established trails, or walk on zero-impact surfaces like slickrock or > sand and gravel. When following social trails (trails made by the > passage of people, rather than by deliberate trail building), stay on > the main trail to minimize proliferation. Walk single file rather > than side by side. When given the choice, follow the edge of the > stream rather than taking a side-trail that climbs over a hill. > 5. Social Impacts Count. Don't rain on other people's wilderness > experience. Respect other's right to solitude – give them space > to do the canyon without you breathing down their necks. Invite > faster parties to pass. Create separation between parties by > speeding up or slowing down, or by taking a break to let the other > party get a ways ahead. > 6. Travel in Small Groups: Large groups tend to have significantly > more physical impacts per person than small groups, and have a > greater impact on other people's feeling of solitude. Limit yourself > to parties of six or less. If need be, split into two groups and > start an hour apart. In small groups, people tend to appreciate the > canyon more. In large groups, they tend to appreciate each other. > Nothing wrong with that, but there are more appropriate places for a > party than in wilderness canyons. > 7. Respect Loose Rocks, wear a helmet: Most canyons are very rocky. > Even the best climbers can get tired and make mistakes. Helmets can > prevent or reduce the severity of head injuries. Medical > professionals say that the average cost of treating a major head > injury is over half a million dollars.
    Courtesy of Bureau of Land Management (BLM)
    GENERAL INFORMATION
    Be careful when hiking in dry washes and slot canyons. Even when the > skies are blue above, flash floods can come down dry washes. > Remember that water can travel many miles down drainages. Do not > camp in dry washes and slot canyons.
    Respect Your pets. > Do not leave your pet in the car when temperatures are above 65° F. > Pets can die from heat exhaustion in a very short time. Leaving pets > tied up outside your vehicle is also not a good idea. Pets often > knock their water over and are left with no water until you come > back. Temperatures during the summer months are often above 100° F.
    Respect the desert. > Tread lightly when traveling (don't leave vehicle tracks off trails) > and leave no trace of your camping. Choose a spot that is already an > established campsite, or that will show zero to very little impact > from your stay. Bring your own wood. Use existing fire pits. Help > keep the Canyon Country clean by taking your trash home and picking > up after the less aware. Protect and conserve scarce water sources > for wildlife by not polluting or bathing in them. Allow space for > wildlife by maintaining your distance, and leave historic sites, > rock art, ruins, and artifacts untouched for the future.
    Cryptobiotic soil > Cryptobiotic Soil is cool stuff, and important to the desert > ecosystem. It forms a black, castle-like crust that is a > conglomeration of algae, fungi and moss. It is an important barrier > to direct erosion, and is one of the only things in the desert that > fixes nitrogen, transforming the sand into soil. Huge expanses of > Cryptosoil have been destroyed by running cattle out here, so the > Crypto that persists is even more important to the ecosystem.
    Don't walk on the Crypto. Go a LONG way out of your way to avoid > chewing up our friend the Crypto. The conscientious canyoneer > chooses a path that avoids the Crypto as much as possible. Walk on > slickrock when available, and stay in the micro-washes between > patches of Crypto. Use established paths. Follow each other single- > file, and step in the footsteps. Stepping on rocks, plants and logs > is better than stepping on the Crypto. Put together a path that > places as few footprints in the Crypto as possible.
    Restrooms > Please use the Hog Spring Picnic Area Toilet, not the local bushes, > if possible. The restroom is located 4.9 miles south on Highway 95.
    WELCOME TO THE NORTH WASH CANYONS
    ATTENTION ALL USERS
    The Public Lands administered by the Bureau of Land Management, > Richfield Field Office, comprise an internationally recognized > recreation destination. The Richfield Field Office manages > approximately 2.1 million acres of public lands in central Utah. The > extraordinarily scenic and diverse landscape, the presence of > interesting cultural and paleontological resources, the vast > expanses, and the opportunities for a wide range of recreational > activities have made the area popular for those seeking outdoor > experiences. Recreational opportunities range from casual > sightseeing and hiking to more physically demanding activities such > as mountain biking, technical canyoneering, and motorized travel.
    Most visitors come during spring and fall, with the spring season > beginning in February and lasting through May, and the fall season > running from September through November. Spring and fall visitors > engage in the full range of recreation activities, including scenic > driving, camping, hiking, mountain biking, canoeing and rafting, > rock climbing, off-highway vehicle (OHV) and dirt bike riding, and > horseback riding. Summer visitation is mainly associated with > touring the nearby National Parks and Monuments (Capitol Reef NP, > Grand Staircase/Escalante NM), Forests (Fish Lake NF and Dixie NF) > and sightseeing in the Henry Mountains.
    Most of the land around the north of Lake Powell is exposed rock - > countless square miles of multicolored sandstone and limestone > strata, heavily eroded into many different forms. Many branched > canyons cut deep into the layered rocks and join the lake or the > Colorado River upstream. UT Highway 95 is the main highway through > this region, though UT Highway 276 also provides some access and > besides these two, several unpaved tracks lead into wilderness study > areas.
    North Wash begins as a sandy creek in the desert beside the Henry > Mountains and flows south, cutting through seven different sandstone > strata representing 80 million years of history in a course of just > 20 miles, and joins Lake Powell opposite Hite by which time the wash > has formed quite an impressive gorge 1,200 feet deep. In the canyon > itself there are many interesting tributaries in the lower course, in > particular four exceedingly narrow slot canyons that join the > northern end of the wash.
    This section of the canyon runs alongside US Highway 95 from a few > miles north of the junction with UT Highway 276 all the way to Lake > Powell, and starts to form the canyon just after the road junction, > where the Navajo sandstone is first exposed. The four slot canyons > are found on the northeast side between mileposts 27 and 29; the > southwest side is sheerer and has no significant tributaries. Around > mile 30 the Navajo is briefly replaced by crumbling ledges of the > underlying Kayenta Formation, and then the wash deepens quickly as > it cuts through the next layer, the cliff-forming Wingate sandstone. > Several other more lengthy branches join here, named canyons being > Butler, Stair, Marinus and Hog, but although colorful and worth > investigation they are not especially narrow except for short > sections in the upper ends where the Navajo layer reappears.
    Your comments regarding the present and future use of your public > lands are encouraged. For more information, contact the Bureau of > Land Management, Richfield Field Office, 150 E., 900 N., Richfield, > UT. (435) 896-1500.
    THANK YOU FOR YOUR COOPERATION
    Canyoneering Information
    ALWAYS...Know before you go: > Carry lots of water and high energy foods. > If hiking, take two large bottles and a reserve supply in a water > bladder or other container. Eating at intervals provides an > opportunity to rest and the energy needed to complete the trail. > During the hotter months, you should drink at least 1 gallon of > water per day. Avoid drinking untreated water unless your life > depends on it.
    STAY FOUND! > Carry maps and use them to track your position. > Trail maps and guidebooks are available at many BLM, National > Park Service and National Forest Service Offices, bookstores, and > other locations in local towns. A great deal of information is > available on the Internet. There are very few established, signed > trails in this area. Follow your route carefully on your map. Never > cut cross-country to shorten a trail, and never enter a wash or slot > canyon that you know nothing about. If you have one, use a GPS unit.
    Stay found. > Search and Rescue operations in many places in Utah take a long > time. Areas are remote and the landscape can be very unforgiving. If > you are lost, do not continue on in hopes of finding your way. > Retrace your route back toward the trailhead until you pick up the > trail or find someone who knows the area. If you cannot retrace your > route, stay put, conserve energy and water, make yourself visible > and await rescue.
    Be prepared in case of emergency. > Don't venture into remote areas with nothing but a t-shirt and > shorts. Carry a windbreaker, sunscreen, sunglasses, maps, matches or > lighter, repair kit, first-aid kit, and extra food, water and > clothing. Travel with someone else and stay together in case of > problems. Discuss your situation calmly and make a plan to improve > it. Let someone know of your plans.
    photo by J. Bierk
    (Tom)
    >
  13. A.J.

    A.J. Guest

    I agree with Larry and Stefan; too much info and the sign is ignored many times. The most important info should be at least highlighted, and put first if possible.

    It's good info, and some will likely read all of it; but again, my opinion is for short and concise. Although, I do also appreciate those reaching out and working with the BLM. Whatever eventually gets put on it is fine by me...

    --- In Yahoo Canyons Group, Lawrence Brigham <larry5925@...> wrote:
    Before I comment I have a question. How will the sign be used? > My comment > It looks like a short and complete manual, my experience is ³manuals² are > disregarded by unwary people.
    Larry the Pessimist > Larry B > Larry5925@embarqmail(dot) com

    > On 5/29/08 8:44 PM, "Tom Jones" <ratagonia@...> wrote:



    > --- In Yahoo Canyons Group <mailto:canyons% 40yahoogroups.com> , "adkramoo"
    <adkramoo@> wrote:



    Tim at the BLM sent me this menu of potential ideas for the sign.

    Time to comment if we want the control promised

    R



    Edited by Tom:

    POINTS OF CONTACT

    EMERGENCY PHONE NUMBERS
    24 Hour Emergency Operator ----------------- Call 911
    Utah State Highway Patrol --------- (435) 896-6471

    United States Department of Interior
    Bureau of Land Management
    Richfield Field Office
    50 East, 900 North
    Richfield, UT 84701
    (435) 896-1500

    Utah State BLM Office
    440 West 200 South, Suite 500
    Salt lake City, UT 84101
    (801) 539- 4000

    United States Department of the Interior
    National Park Service
    Lake Powell National Recreation Area
    Bullfrog Visitor Center (435) 684-7420

    Garfield County
    Garfield County Sheriff (435) 676-2678

    IMPORTANT NOTE:
    There is at best very limited cellular or satellite telephone
    coverage in this area. The nearest public telephones are located in
    Hite, 25 miles south on Utah Highway 95, and Bullfrog on Lake
    Powell, 40 miles west on Utah Highway 276 or at the community of
    Hanksville, located 29 miles north on Utah Highway 95.

    Canyoneering Ethics

    Travelling in Technical Canyons

    Many canyons in this area are technical canyons that require ropes,
    equipment, information, experience and technique to traverse
    safely. If you do not have these things, please explore carefully,
    and make sure you can exit the canyon following the route that you
    entered.

    Please minimize your impacts to the landscape. Some pointers:
    1. Stay in the Watercourse: traveling IN the watercourse tends to
    have zero impact – the watercourse is often slickrock or sand and
    gravel. Taking paths off to the side to avoid small drops has an
    enormous impact and should be avoided religiously. Figure out how to
    deal with obstacles directly, rather than running off into the
    desert anytime a difficulty presents itself. We are Canyoneers, not
    Rim-aneers. Plus - staying in the watercourse is more fun..
    2. Don't Bolt: Utah's canyons have quite a passel of bolts already
    and do not need more. If you come to a drop that you think needs a
    bolt anchor, look around, open your mind and figure it out. All the
    canyons in this area have been descended without bolts.
    3. Don't Leave Trash: Slings and fixed ropes are litter, pure and
    simple. Leave only as much sling as is consistent with safe
    canyoneering. Ropes left in place are litter and should be removed
    and packed out.
    4. Watch Your Step: Pay attention to where you walk. Stay on
    established trails, or walk on zero-impact surfaces like slickrock or
    sand and gravel. When following social trails (trails made by the
    passage of people, rather than by deliberate trail building), stay on
    the main trail to minimize proliferation. Walk single file rather
    than side by side. When given the choice, follow the edge of the
    stream rather than taking a side-trail that climbs over a hill.
    5. Social Impacts Count. Don't rain on other people's wilderness
    experience. Respect other's right to solitude – give them space
    to do the canyon without you breathing down their necks. Invite
    faster parties to pass. Create separation between parties by
    speeding up or slowing down, or by taking a break to let the other
    party get a ways ahead.
    6. Travel in Small Groups: Large groups tend to have significantly
    more physical impacts per person than small groups, and have a
    greater impact on other people's feeling of solitude. Limit yourself
    to parties of six or less. If need be, split into two groups and
    start an hour apart. In small groups, people tend to appreciate the
    canyon more. In large groups, they tend to appreciate each other.
    Nothing wrong with that, but there are more appropriate places for a
    party than in wilderness canyons.
    7. Respect Loose Rocks, wear a helmet: Most canyons are very rocky.
    Even the best climbers can get tired and make mistakes. Helmets can
    prevent or reduce the severity of head injuries. Medical
    professionals say that the average cost of treating a major head
    injury is over half a million dollars.

    Courtesy of Bureau of Land Management (BLM)

    GENERAL INFORMATION

    Be careful when hiking in dry washes and slot canyons. Even when the
    skies are blue above, flash floods can come down dry washes.
    Remember that water can travel many miles down drainages. Do not
    camp in dry washes and slot canyons.

    Respect Your pets.
    Do not leave your pet in the car when temperatures are above 65° F.
    Pets can die from heat exhaustion in a very short time. Leaving pets
    tied up outside your vehicle is also not a good idea. Pets often
    knock their water over and are left with no water until you come
    back. Temperatures during the summer months are often above 100° F.

    Respect the desert.
    Tread lightly when traveling (don't leave vehicle tracks off trails)
    and leave no trace of your camping. Choose a spot that is already an
    established campsite, or that will show zero to very little impact
    from your stay. Bring your own wood. Use existing fire pits. Help
    keep the Canyon Country clean by taking your trash home and picking
    up after the less aware. Protect and conserve scarce water sources
    for wildlife by not polluting or bathing in them. Allow space for
    wildlife by maintaining your distance, and leave historic sites,
    rock art, ruins, and artifacts untouched for the future.

    Cryptobiotic soil
    Cryptobiotic Soil is cool stuff, and important to the desert
    ecosystem. It forms a black, castle-like crust that is a
    conglomeration of algae, fungi and moss. It is an important barrier
    to direct erosion, and is one of the only things in the desert that
    fixes nitrogen, transforming the sand into soil. Huge expanses of
    Cryptosoil have been destroyed by running cattle out here, so the
    Crypto that persists is even more important to the ecosystem.

    Don't walk on the Crypto. Go a LONG way out of your way to avoid
    chewing up our friend the Crypto. The conscientious canyoneer
    chooses a path that avoids the Crypto as much as possible. Walk on
    slickrock when available, and stay in the micro-washes between
    patches of Crypto. Use established paths. Follow each other single-
    file, and step in the footsteps. Stepping on rocks, plants and logs
    is better than stepping on the Crypto. Put together a path that
    places as few footprints in the Crypto as possible.

    Restrooms
    Please use the Hog Spring Picnic Area Toilet, not the local bushes,
    if possible. The restroom is located 4.9 miles south on Highway 95.

    WELCOME TO THE NORTH WASH CANYONS

    ATTENTION ALL USERS

    The Public Lands administered by the Bureau of Land Management,
    Richfield Field Office, comprise an internationally recognized
    recreation destination. The Richfield Field Office manages
    approximately 2.1 million acres of public lands in central Utah. The
    extraordinarily scenic and diverse landscape, the presence of
    interesting cultural and paleontological resources, the vast
    expanses, and the opportunities for a wide range of recreational
    activities have made the area popular for those seeking outdoor
    experiences. Recreational opportunities range from casual
    sightseeing and hiking to more physically demanding activities such
    as mountain biking, technical canyoneering, and motorized travel.

    Most visitors come during spring and fall, with the spring season
    beginning in February and lasting through May, and the fall season
    running from September through November. Spring and fall visitors
    engage in the full range of recreation activities, including scenic
    driving, camping, hiking, mountain biking, canoeing and rafting,
    rock climbing, off-highway vehicle (OHV) and dirt bike riding, and
    horseback riding. Summer visitation is mainly associated with
    touring the nearby National Parks and Monuments (Capitol Reef NP,
    Grand Staircase/Escalante NM), Forests (Fish Lake NF and Dixie NF)
    and sightseeing in the Henry Mountains.

    Most of the land around the north of Lake Powell is exposed rock -
    countless square miles of multicolored sandstone and limestone
    strata, heavily eroded into many different forms. Many branched
    canyons cut deep into the layered rocks and join the lake or the
    Colorado River upstream. UT Highway 95 is the main highway through
    this region, though UT Highway 276 also provides some access and
    besides these two, several unpaved tracks lead into wilderness study
    areas.

    North Wash begins as a sandy creek in the desert beside the Henry
    Mountains and flows south, cutting through seven different sandstone
    strata representing 80 million years of history in a course of just
    20 miles, and joins Lake Powell opposite Hite by which time the wash
    has formed quite an impressive gorge 1,200 feet deep. In the canyon
    itself there are many interesting tributaries in the lower course, in
    particular four exceedingly narrow slot canyons that join the
    northern end of the wash.

    This section of the canyon runs alongside US Highway 95 from a few
    miles north of the junction with UT Highway 276 all the way to Lake
    Powell, and starts to form the canyon just after the road junction,
    where the Navajo sandstone is first exposed. The four slot canyons
    are found on the northeast side between mileposts 27 and 29; the
    southwest side is sheerer and has no significant tributaries. Around
    mile 30 the Navajo is briefly replaced by crumbling ledges of the
    underlying Kayenta Formation, and then the wash deepens quickly as
    it cuts through the next layer, the cliff-forming Wingate sandstone.
    Several other more lengthy branches join here, named canyons being
    Butler, Stair, Marinus and Hog, but although colorful and worth
    investigation they are not especially narrow except for short
    sections in the upper ends where the Navajo layer reappears.

    Your comments regarding the present and future use of your public
    lands are encouraged. For more information, contact the Bureau of
    Land Management, Richfield Field Office, 150 E., 900 N., Richfield,
    UT. (435) 896-1500.

    THANK YOU FOR YOUR COOPERATION

    Canyoneering Information

    ALWAYS...Know before you go:
    Carry lots of water and high energy foods.
    If hiking, take two large bottles and a reserve supply in a water
    bladder or other container. Eating at intervals provides an
    opportunity to rest and the energy needed to complete the trail.
    During the hotter months, you should drink at least 1 gallon of
    water per day. Avoid drinking untreated water unless your life
    depends on it.

    STAY FOUND!
    Carry maps and use them to track your position.
    Trail maps and guidebooks are available at many BLM, National
    Park Service and National Forest Service Offices, bookstores, and
    other locations in local towns. A great deal of information is
    available on the Internet. There are very few established, signed
    trails in this area. Follow your route carefully on your map. Never
    cut cross-country to shorten a trail, and never enter a wash or slot
    canyon that you know nothing about. If you have one, use a GPS unit.

    Stay found.
    Search and Rescue operations in many places in Utah take a long
    time. Areas are remote and the landscape can be very unforgiving. If
    you are lost, do not continue on in hopes of finding your way.
    Retrace your route back toward the trailhead until you pick up the
    trail or find someone who knows the area. If you cannot retrace your
    route, stay put, conserve energy and water, make yourself visible
    and await rescue.

    Be prepared in case of emergency.
    Don't venture into remote areas with nothing but a t-shirt and
    shorts. Carry a windbreaker, sunscreen, sunglasses, maps, matches or
    lighter, repair kit, first-aid kit, and extra food, water and
    clothing. Travel with someone else and stay together in case of
    problems. Discuss your situation calmly and make a plan to improve
    it. Let someone know of your plans.

    photo by J. Bierk

    (Tom)




    > >
  14. adkramoo

    adkramoo Guest

    --- In Yahoo Canyons Group, "A.J." <adventure_geek@...> wrote:
    I agree with Larry and Stefan; too much info and the sign is ignored > many times. The most important info should be at least highlighted, > and put first if possible.

    Everyone's comments have been copied and passed on to Tim at the BLM. More? R
  15. Mike Dallin

    Mike Dallin Guest

    Replace the crypto section with this classic slice of National Park Americana:

    http://tinyurl.com/4zed2h

    Add "get some skills" to the bolt section, for good measure.

    And while we're here, if you are going to tell people not to put in bolts, you should tell them to avoid rope grooves as well.

    M

    -----Original Message----- From: Yahoo Canyons Group [mailto:Yahoo Canyons Group] On Behalf Of adkramoo Sent: Friday, May 30, 2008 8:03 AM To: Yahoo Canyons Group Subject: [from Canyons Group] Re: Sandthrax Cam Sign

    --- In Yahoo Canyons Group, "A.J." <adventure_geek@...> wrote:
    I agree with Larry and Stefan; too much info and the sign is ignored > many times. The most important info should be at least highlighted, > and put first if possible.

    Everyone's comments have been copied and passed on to Tim at the BLM. More? R

    ---

    When you post, please change the Subject appropriately, to make reading and searching easier. You can use the following abbreviations: TRIP = Trip Report; BETA = Canyon Beta; PARTNER = Partner and/or Rides; ETHICS = Ethics; TECH = Technical Questions and Tips; BIZ = E Group Business; SALE = Stuff for Sale. Please use a Tilde ~ after the abbreviation, so we know you are coding for us, such as:

    Subject: BIZ~ New Abbreviation List - working?

    To change your delivery options, go to the Canyons Egroup page on yahoo: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/canyons/

    This will require logging into Yahoo. Click on the &amp;amp;quot;Edit My Membership&amp;amp;quot; link, and change your delivery option. Press &amp;amp;quot;Save Changes&amp;amp;quot;.



    WEB ONLY OPTION will not deliver email; you must visit the web site to view messages. Groups Links
  16. adkramoo

    adkramoo Guest

    --- In Yahoo Canyons Group, "Mike Dallin" <mike_dallin@...> wrote:
    Replace the crypto section with this classic slice of National Park > Americana:
    http://tinyurl.com/4zed2h

    Claaaaasic!

    > Add "get some skills" to the bolt section, for good measure.

    Wise guy!

    > And while we're here, if you are going to tell people not to put in bolts,> you should tell them to avoid rope grooves as well.

    Good one. Be kinda weird having the kiosk talking about rope gooves and bolts with no map to the places proper. Confuse the casual visitor, which is fine by me. ;-) If we encourage more people into the area more people will get stuck in Shimrock etc. ;-) R
  17. Mike Dallin

    Mike Dallin Guest

    >Good one. Be kinda weird having the kiosk talking about rope gooves >and bolts with no map to the places proper. Confuse the casual >visitor, which is fine by me. ;-) >If we encourage more people into the area more people will get stuck >in Shimrock etc. ;-)

    Seriously, I'd take out the text of the No Bolts, No Rope Grooves etc, and replace it with one sheet of paper with a couple of photos of things to avoid - bolts, rope grooves, graffiti pictographs, whatever else. Maybe show pictures of them with big red "ghostbusters" style lines through them, with the heading "help keep our canyons pristine" or some such. Showing photos of what to avoid will be more striking than a bunch of text that few will take the time to read.

    M
  18. adkramoo

    adkramoo Guest

    I love the ghostbuster lines idea.

    Here is come more options offered by the BLM. I am still against the picnic table, but established fire pits might be a nice way to set limits.....errr, maybe not. While another piece of anything seems counter productive, the offer of a trailhead register, for us to just use as a message board among ourselves sounds interesting. A running journal too? ;-) R

    Here is Tim's comments

    "Hi, I'm with the Government and we're here to help you" My favorite introduction

    Now compare the above with these lines:

    "Give me all your money" shadow in the alley

    "Give me all your money" IRS

    See the difference?

    I will have some BLM Agency info and Public Contact Info pages, maybe some regs like how long you can camp, etc - the other themes are yours -

    The ones I started with are the SIte Specific and Safety. If I was wrong on these, completely start over, sorry. Other people use the site too and I generally write for anyone who might possibly be new to the area and have some time and inclination to stop, get out of their car and see whats around the next bend.

    I don't have the roof shingles on and the backing on the Kiosk so no hurry on your review and revsions. I'm gone this next week and doing another Kiosk near Capitol Reef NP too so can do that one first. and yes, I wrote more rather than less since I wasn't sure what really mattered to you- I just wanted a draft to you asap for review. (And I'm a bureacrat - we write a lot that doesn't say anything anyway - ever see the federal budget?)

    SO, generally, what I hear is:

    No maps, OK check mileage, OK Less writing is more, OK, OK, OK (probably especially that "Welcome" page...")

    FYI: I do have some fire rings and a picnic table - their installation would not result in more regs - its resource protection which I'm interested in. If the community thinks they're necessary or might be easier to clean up ashes, etc. , I can put them in. Otherwise, minnimal services means less work for BLM too...(I could probably also get a grader down there sometime to better define the roads and spurs if warranted). Hey, I also have a small trailhead register type box I can put in if you want to use it as a message box.

    Any photos, logos, etc. you might want? They break up the pages better than text and most people are visually based and reading challenged when on vacation anyway

    ("Honest officer, I never saw that speed limit sign")

    And thank you:

    Tim Finger Outdoor Recreation Planner Richfield Field Office
  19. gbrandthart

    gbrandthart Guest

    > Here is come more options offered by the BLM. I am still against the > picnic table, but established fire pits might be a nice way to set > limits.....errr, maybe not. While another piece of anything seems > counter productive, the offer of a trailhead register, for us to just > use as a message board among ourselves sounds interesting. A running > journal too? ;-) > R

    I am not really into a table or fire ring either. Make the place nice and comfortable and the competition from other folks will increase.

    Rather than a register box I think a push pin message board might be a nice addition. This board could even be on the back of the sign. Less maintenance as well.

    And I say no way on bringing a grader in there. In my experience I've usually seen that idea do more harm than good.

    Brandt
  20. adkramoo

    adkramoo Guest

    --- In Yahoo Canyons Group, "gbrandthart" <gbrandthart@...> wrote: > I am not really into a table or fire ring either. Make the place nice > and comfortable and the competition from other folks will increase.

    Agreed. Passed along
    Rather than a register box I think a push pin message board might be a > nice addition. This board could even be on the back of the sign. Less > maintenance as well.

    My concern is that quite often the place is a wind tunnel and the sign is at an unprotected spot. I hate the idea of a second structure, but at least it will protect messages from becoming litter.

    > And I say no way on bringing a grader in there. In my experience I've > usually seen that idea do more harm than good.

    And it doesn't seem needed, does it? R
Similar Threads: Sandthrax Sign
Forum Title Date
General Discussion Signs at Sandthrax Camp Wednesday at 2:02 PM
Archives - Yahoo Canyons Group sandthrax development- the sign May 30, 2008
General Discussion Sandthrax Toilet Sep 30, 2020
Accidents and Near Misses Type 3 Fun in Sandthrax Jun 20, 2020
Trip Reports Sandthrax 2/1/2020 Feb 2, 2020
General Discussion More new bolts / hardware in Sandthrax Canyon May 29, 2019