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One-Trick Pony: A FreezeFest Flick

Discussion in 'Trip Reports' started by Dan Ransom, Dec 21, 2017.

  1. Dan Ransom

    Dan Ransom Staff Member

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    'Tis the season to share my latest short film "One Trick Pony." This is the story of Steve Ramras, his obsession with canyoneering and a totally absurd New Year's tradition in Bears Ears National Monument.

    I put together a short teaser of this last week, but today I'm psyched to put out a longer edit. Thanks to many of you who were there last year and helped make this film possible. (I'm looking at you Wes, Chris, Nate, and many others.)

    Hope you enjoy it!

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  2. Wes1

    Wes1

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    Awesome!


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
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  3. Wayne

    Wayne

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    Great piece! Thanks for sharing it with us.
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  4. Kuenn

    Kuenn

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    What an enjoyable 5 minutes 48 seconds that will certainly make you smile! Visuals and audio - excellent!!

    I must say, I like the title but it is quite the specious label for the legend. Like calling Beethoven a "songwriter".
    Last edited: Dec 21, 2017
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  5. Dan Ransom

    Dan Ransom Staff Member

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    Hahaha. The backstory on the title is a joke between Ram and I from years ago. I started spending a lot more of my time in canyons in the Grand and elswewhere, while he was always going out into Navajo sandstone slots. If he ever invited me on a trip, I'd decline saying "all those canyons look the same." And I started calling him the "One-Trick Pony."

    When we shot the interview, the first question I asked him was what that one-trick pony reputation was all about. I didn't intend to use it all, just wanted him to relax and joke on camera before we got to the rest of the stuff. But you have to admit, the fact the guy can't ride a bike tells you a lot about his obsession for canyons!

    Don't worry, he's definitely a man of many talents. He's done some pretty impressive alpine climbing, but the real surprise might be he's rumored to be a fairly decent golfer.

    Yep. Golf.
  6. Ram

    Ram

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    Was bought a bike on my 5th birthday....stolen the next day
    Was bought a bike on my 6th birthday....stolen the same day...so it went back in New YAWK City, back then
    Never did learn to ride
    As for the golf....was never much more than a "Bogey" man. When he did see a picture of my swing, he mocked even that possibility...I only play, maybe for a day, on July mountain trips to the North Cascades of Washington anymore. After a few weeks of snow and rock, our crew's feet turn to hamburger.
    We rent the cart, clubs and all. Play LOTS of holes.
    I was a 4 year letter man in high school, captain of the team for 3 years. Got all the girls...NOT....oh and the team's record in my tenure, you ask? No wins, 64 losses.
    Now your canyon-golfer star is....drum roll.....Big John Diener, who was a scratch golfer, I think? Which is particularly impressive..... as like a baseball batter, the shorter swing of average height people is way less prone to flaw, so to play that well at 6" 7" is mind blowing.
    Thanks Dan, for telling all these people, all these lies about me.
    SAVE THE WILDERNESS!!! BEARS EARS!!
    Last edited: Dec 21, 2017
  7. Kuenn

    Kuenn

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    It's internet banter, what do you expect?

    Maybe not the rockstar athlete but pretty talented at spinning a yarn...I've read some real zingers over the years. ;)

    Lot of similarities between golf and canyoning: Wading, searching, improvising, sand traps, bringing a large bag of tools but only using 1 or 2 effectively.... lying about how good you are or are not. ;p

    Keep working at that short game, you might need it in 20 years when you slow down a bit. We can hike the Robert Trent Jones golf trail in my backyard...bring John and Dan along too to make the foursome. :)
    Last edited: Dec 27, 2017
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  8. Gearhound

    Gearhound

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    Nicely done! That looks like a really beautiful area!
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  9. Brewhaha

    Brewhaha Mountain Goat

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    Amazing! Well done!
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  10. Rapterman

    Rapterman

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  11. Disruptive_Rescue

    Disruptive_Rescue

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    Looks incredible...
  12. Steve Kugath

    Steve Kugath

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    A beauty Dan...as always amazing footage artistically pieced together. Such a creative genius!

    Ram you are my hero...long may you wander the canyon realms!

    SK
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  13. Dan Ransom

    Dan Ransom Staff Member

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  14. ratagonia

    ratagonia

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  15. Southern Canyoneer

    Southern Canyoneer Desert Hiker

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    Fantastic and well done!
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  16. Ram

    Ram

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    Thank you. Yes it is well done. Dan is an extraordinary talent and he is deeply committed to the cause of public lands remaining public. Also the efforts of Dean Brooks, Tom Jones, Jenny West, Chris Gorzalski, Steve Allen and many many more, many you have never heard of, to hold the dike that threatens to burst, have been stars too. Our public lands and our shrinking wilderness remain at risk. It has been a year now since these areas have had their protections rolled back. Sure the case is still in the courts, as suits were filed immediately. But if you think that things are on hold, you don't get it. The day after the roll back, stock ponds were dug, just waiting for water to fill them, along The Wolverine Loop, in Escalante. THE NEXT DAY!! Totally illegal, but it happened anyway. Tip of the iceberg.

    The whole point of the video was to draw attention to the risk that these areas face. Make noise. Care. Fight. An editorial in my regional paper today from the ranking member in the Senate Appropriations Subcommittee on the Interior, Environmental and Relates Agencies and the ranking member of the House Committee on Natural Resources, is worth a read. We need to stand up and insist that the laws are followed. Please be active

    https://www.denverpost.com/2018/12/...ustice-doesnt-want-to-hear-our-legal-opinion/

    It’s clear Trump illegally shrunk Bears Ears; the Department of Justice doesn’t want to hear our legal opinion
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    Katherine Frey, The Washington Post
    The sun sets over Bears Ears National Monument, as seen from the Moki Dugway on June 11, north of Mexican Hat, Utah.
    By Tom Udall and Raúl M. Grijalva | Guest Commentary
    December 6, 2018 at 1:24 pm

    Almost from the day he took office, President Donald Trump’s environmental agenda has put the profits of big corporations ahead of the public interest.

    While Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke pays lip service to balanced uses of public resources, Trump and his administration have overwhelmingly sided with polluting industries who prefer unchecked resource extraction with minimal public oversight.

    The Trump approach to public lands has been little more than a parade of handouts to corporate executives and lobbyists who have the administration’s ear. One of the ugliest consequences is President Trump’s illegal destruction of Bears Ears National Monument and Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument in southern Utah, where in a 2017 executive order he attempted to shrink monument boundaries despite lacking any authority to do so.

    Let’s be clear: no president can unilaterally eliminate existing federal environmental protections on our public lands, however much President Trump may prefer otherwise. His action is clearly illegal, and allowing him to follow through on it would set a precedent that Americans of all political stripes should oppose.

    That’s why, along with 118 of our colleagues — 26 senators and 92 representatives — we filed an amicus brief on Nov. 19 in the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia arguing not only that these national monument boundary reductions are legally void, but that they clearly contradict congressional intent as expressed in the Antiquities Act of 1906, the law President Clinton used to create Grand Staircase-Escalante in 1996 and President Obama used to create Bears Ears in 2016.

    This lawmaker coalition, which includes both House and Senate Democratic leadership, represents a strong congressional rebuke to the Trump administration’s insistence that public lands are rightfully the property of oil, gas and coal companies — and puts the administration on notice that it should expect strong oversight of its industry-first agenda in the next Congress.

    Sixteen presidents — Republican and Democratic — have used the Antiquities Act for more than a century to protect precious places for future generations. The Constitution, in black and white, gives Congress the power to manage public lands. The president may not create new executive authorities as the need or desire may arise.

    The Antiquities Act gives the president power to designate national monument boundaries on existing federal lands and waters. Congress gave the president that power, understanding that the legislative process can be slow and deliberative — and that many public lands and waters could be lost without swift action.

    Nowhere does the Antiquities Act give authority to reduce boundaries, revoke monument status or otherwise reduce standing levels of protection.

    Most federal cases deal in complicated questions of interpretation. The legal language at issue here is unusually clear.

    We find it curious, therefore, that the Department of Justice has taken the unusual step of asking Judge Tanya Chutkan not to allow our filing to be included in the legal record of this case. As members of Congress, we have not only a clear interest in the outcome of the case but unique standing to intervene on behalf of congressional prerogatives. Allowing the executive branch to invent federal land use policy on the fly, outside the boundaries of federal law, is not just a terrible idea on the merits — it is a serious blow to the separation of powers.

    This is not a Pandora’s box anyone of any party wants to open. If President Trump’s order stands, Republicans who support his environmental agenda today could face a sudden change of heart the next time a Democrat occupies the White House. In our minds, it is better to keep to the constitutional principles that have served us for centuries than to let a president decide which laws he does and doesn’t follow on a given day.

    This is to say nothing of the merits of this specific case, which frankly do the administration no credit. The administration has long claimed the monument reductions were never about opening land to extraction. This doesn’t pass the straight face test, and we have already seen strong evidence to the contrary. Portions cut out of the monuments are known to be rich in oil, coal and uranium, and industry figures have filed claims on several parcels of land formerly within the monument boundaries. Feigning ignorance of these implications only weakens the administration’s case.

    The bottom line is that national monuments enjoy overwhelming public support, and presidents have no power to revoke or shrink them with the flick of a pen. That power is simply not found anywhere in the law. The Trump administration does themselves no favors by claiming otherwise. If they wish to locate such power elsewhere, they should say so. If not, they should admit that President Trump’s actions were never legally supported, and that even industry-first administrations need to respect congressional intent, as our Framers made clear.

    Sen. Tom Udall (D-N.M.) is ranking member of the Senate Appropriations Subcommittee on Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies. Rep. Raúl M. Grijalva (D-Ariz.) is ranking member of the House Committee on Natural Resources.
    Last edited: Dec 8, 2018