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Help: Serious Winter Gloves

Discussion in 'Tech Tips and Gear' started by townsend, Dec 18, 2018.

  1. townsend

    townsend

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    Location:
    Plano, TX
    Today I hiked lower Weehawken Creek trail, in the snow (this is near Ouray, CO, for the uninformed).

    This was the first winter hilke that I have taken with my new gloves. My first pair of "four season" gloves -- Give'r (cost about 100.00 at REI). Unfortunately, though it was about 30-35 degrees, they did NOT keep my fingers warm. I do have Raynaud's, but even my non-Raynaud's fingers got really cold. All my fingers on both hands were cold, with very little to no feeling. And when I took the gloves off briefly (when I needed the dexterity to push the camera button), since my fingers had no feeling, it was a struggle to get the gloves back on.

    I try to temper my expectations, but in my opinion, these gloves under performed. The cardboard sleeve that they are sold with says they are good down to -20. Huh?

    If they are four season, it must be the four seasons of a state like Florida.

    I need some serious winter gloves. I am not talking about canyoneering, I am simply talking about winter hiking and other things, like, what if I have to change my tire because of a flat? Or when I shovel snow off my driveway.

    These gloves were fleece lined, but I'm not impressed.

    I probably need some mountaineering alpine-type gloves, maybe even mitts, because with mitts, the fingers aren't isolated and easier to kept warmer. I probably have to pay around 150.00 for these. Whatever, I feel that people on this forum are gear heads and can help me. Thank you.
  2. stefan

    stefan wandering utahn

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    i'm not sure what's the warmest out there, but i've been using the Marmot BTU Glove for biking all winter. it's a fingered glove and they've worked well for me. marmot says they're the warmest in their line and the price isn't bad either.
    townsend likes this.
  3. hank moon

    hank moon lovely ligatures

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    Mitts for sure, esp. w/Reynaud's (I don't have that, but do have poor circulation in the hands). I love these for snowboarding / snowshoeing (I have an older model FWIW). Might also consider these and/or hand warmers to supplement.
    townsend likes this.
  4. Craig

    Craig Feeling My Way

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    Make sure you get the correct glove size. Too big is better than too small. I find that If the glove compresses my skin even the slightest amount, my hands get cold no matter how thick the gloves.
    townsend and John Diener like this.
  5. Brian in SLC

    Brian in SLC Brian in SLC

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    Location:
    Salt Lake City
    You might try mittens with chemical heat packs (those shake and warm things). I use the toe warmers which have a little adhesive which helps them stick in place in a glove or mitten and they're a bit thinner which is nice for snug fitting gloves/mittens.

    Besides getting medical treatment for your Raynauds...is there any conditioning that's doable to lesson the effects of cold on your hands? I used to stick my hands in ice cold water until they went numb a few times a week and it seemed to help with my circulation. My hands (knock on wood) are pretty warm.

    I've also heard an opposite type training works...where folks go outside very under dressed so their core temperature seems to go down, but, leave the hands in a warm/hot bucket of water. Supposedly tricks the body into sending blood flow to the extremities rather than pulling it in if the core feels coldish. Dunno.

    Another thing I've found over the years, is, when doing anything outside requiring a glove/mitten, having too big a glove/mitten tends to make me overgrip to hang onto an ice tool, snow shovel, or ski pole (etc). A thinner, snugger glove actually helps my hands stay warmer. A bit counter intuitive, but, really seems to work for me. Even on fairly cold days (we skied several days in Maine last year over xmas at -20F), I rarely put a thick glove on.

    That said, if my hands are just along for the ride, so to speak, give me a big, loose pair of thick mittens! I have the BD Mercury Mitts which I like, but, a light pair of 800 fill down mittens would be super. Also, OR mitten liners with thick, dachstein mitts works for me too.

    I spend a fair time every winter with light gloves on coldish days. Kinda bad about putting on warm gloves when I should. I wonder if, over time, I've just conditioned my hands to tolerate cold temperatures better. No pain, no gain I guess.
    townsend likes this.
  6. townsend

    townsend

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    Location:
    Plano, TX
    Thanks for all your comments. I finally decided to go with BD Mercury Mittens, and to boot, Backcountry had then on for 25% of the common list price.

    They just arrived today, and if anyone of you are familiar with them, you know that they are big, burly, and warm. I think they are truly four-season gloves. Since I hike a lot around Ouray, it is common to be in an "alpine" altitude (unless you stay urban and do the perimeter trail). Every trail is up, up and away, in terms of altitude, beginning at 7700' (Ouray's posted altitude) and going higher. So I think they will serve me well.

    Now freeze fest, that is another question. Maybe in another year for me. Best wishes for a great freeze fest.

    Scott
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