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helicopter hand signals

Discussion in 'Archives - Yahoo Canyons Group' started by davewyo1, Sep 8, 2005.

  1. davewyo1

    davewyo1 Guest

    to(maybe)answer an earlier q. regarding how you signal to a hovering aircraft that you do not need help...verify this for yourself,but i've been told that waving your arms means"i'm okay"while hands out to the side in a cross-like position means"please land"
  2. beadysee

    beadysee Guest

    --- In Yahoo Canyons Group, "davewyo1" <davewyo@h...> wrote: > to(maybe)answer an earlier q. regarding how you signal to a hovering > aircraft that you do not need help...verify this for yourself,but i've been told that waving your arms means"i'm okay"while hands out to the side in a cross-like position means"please land"

    I don't think so.

    At least in Europe, when requesting a rescue from a helicopter, you wave both your hands over your head.

    Waving one hand means no rescue required.

    Which made me wonder, what to do, if one arm is broken...(I guess just sit there, if alone, with a forlorn look in your eyes...).

    Anyhoo, this info comes from an alpine club sticker in the back of a guidebook to the Dolomites.

    -Brian in SLC
  3. Rob Heineman

    Rob Heineman Guest

    --- In Yahoo Canyons Group, "beadysee" <beadysee@y...> wrote:

    > At least in Europe, when requesting a rescue from a helicopter, you > wave both your hands over your head.

    Here, this is the wave off signal. They may return to base. Probably not what you want. Hold the arms still.

    Sad how quickly we forget our scout manuals. To refresh:

    http://www.scoutingresources.org.uk/codes_rescue.html

    Rob
  4. Hah! I wonder what you'd do in Canada where many of the guides are imported from Europe or European certified. Definitely confuses things. -steve

    --- Rob Heineman heineman@alum.mit.edu> wrote:

    > --- In Yahoo Canyons Group, "beadysee" <beadysee@y...> wrote:
    > At least in Europe, when requesting a rescue from a helicopter, you
    > wave both your hands over your head.
    Here, this is the wave off signal. They may return to base. > Probably > not what you want. Hold the arms still.
    Sad how quickly we forget our scout manuals. To refresh:
    http://www.scoutingresources.org.uk/codes_rescue.html
    > Rob

    >

  5. desertres

    desertres Guest

    Isnt it waving your hands above your head is a messaging for them not to land(due to whatever conditions)?, doesnt mean not to rescue.10 to 1 they dont care if rescuee waves because they will decide the next step. Now if they were landing under military conditions, thats different.

    Waveoff signal is thumb down according to the US military handbook?.

    --- In Yahoo Canyons Group, steve mestdagh <s_mestdagh@y...> wrote: > Hah! I wonder what you'd do in Canada where many of the guides are > imported from Europe or European certified. Definitely confuses things. > -steve
    --- Rob Heineman <heineman@a...> wrote:
    > --- In Yahoo Canyons Group, "beadysee" <beadysee@y...> wrote:

    > At least in Europe, when requesting a rescue from a helicopter, you

    > wave both your hands over your head.

    Here, this is the wave off signal. They may return to base.
    Probably
    not what you want. Hold the arms still.

    Sad how quickly we forget our scout manuals. To refresh:

    http://www.scoutingresources.org.uk/codes_rescue.html

    > Rob





    > > > >
  6. --- desertres desertres@yahoo.com> wrote:

    > Now if they were landing under military conditions, thats > different.

    Yeah, if you're pointing a gun at them, they won't land. Sorry, couldn't resist .. -s

  7. penmartens

    penmartens Guest

    I spoke with a search and rescue friend. This issue is too important to have unclear or flippant responses. In the US one hand overhead not moving means "I see you. OR I am fine." Two hands waving overhead means "I am in distress, need help." Any unsual behavior; chaotic, energetic, hiding, waving one or two hands, etc. will be responded to also. The pilot will decide how to proceed; land, radio to ground crew, radio from spotter plane to helicopter, etc. as he sees fit. It really won't matter what you think (s)he should do. Also, cloth on a stick being waved in the air will signal distress. White shows up in the desert very well. The SAR guy backed his methods with this story (the short version): Young man from lower 48 decided to live in Alaska. Sold everything and went to build cabin. Hurt should couldn't build cabin. Deep snow couldn't get out. Wintered in 4 walled tent. Desperate circumstances. Mom, finding out what crazy son did, insisted on a search. Pilots found him. With one arm too badly injured to use, he calmly lifted the good arm and stood there. The pilot took that to mean he was fine. Tipped wings and reported back to mom. Man knowing he had been seen and beleiving he would soon be rescued returned to tent, burning what little he had left for warmth until help arrived. As he burned his hunting license, he noticed the rescue signals on back and realized he had signaled 'ok'. He wrote in his journal of the terrible mistake he had made. Meanwhile, mom insisted someone have a conversation with son. So pilot went back, landed and snowshoed to tent. He found son who had shot self not being able to face an entire winter and freezing to death. If you do not remember the signals, jump up and down, wave things, bring as much attention to yourself as possible. Being the thorough and diligent people they are, they will check on you. Penny
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