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Tech Tip: Question Gloves

Discussion in 'Tech Tips and Gear' started by Bootboy, Mar 24, 2013.

  1. ratagonia

    ratagonia

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    Location:
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    Atlas Thermafit most of the time. Add the Playtex dish gloves in cold canyons. That covers about 99% of canyons...

    Tom
    Tyler likes this.
  2. TJ Cottam

    TJ Cottam Adventure Plus

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    I have a pair of the Kong gloves. Reasonably warm, but just like every glove I've had not as durable as I had hoped. I'm also constantly searching for a better glove with no luck yet.
  3. Kuenn

    Kuenn

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    Agree on all accounts.

    If you like leather (for the right application), PMI goat leather gloves are my personal favorites. The fingers offer good dexterity (for a leather glove) and the added layers are in the right places for wear points. A little pricey but will last if cared for properly...I typically get 1-2 years out of a pair.

    PMI tech gloves. (PMI Rope Tech gloves-shown)
    TimLarson.25 likes this.
  4. Benjamin Pelletier

    Benjamin Pelletier

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    Location:
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    When it's warm enough, I don't use any gloves -- just have to set the friction right and it's no issue. When it's cold, I use 3mm neoprene gloves with kevlar palms. Without the kevlar palms, I'd eat through a pair of gloves in one or two canyons, but the kevlar palms seem to make them last pretty well. They are substantially harder to grip the rope with, but again, just have to set the friction right and it's no issue. In a big box outdoors store, the kevlar palms are usually around $50, but I can usually find them for $20-$30 when I want a new pair. The only pretreatment I give them is Aquaseal on the finger seams.
  5. TJ Cottam

    TJ Cottam Adventure Plus

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    Which gloves are you using that have the kevlar palm?
  6. Benjamin Pelletier

    Benjamin Pelletier

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    Location:
    Sunland, California
  7. TJ Cottam

    TJ Cottam Adventure Plus

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    How well do they hold up between your thumb and finger where the rope runs?
  8. Mike Zampino

    Mike Zampino Canyon season never ends.

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    Location:
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    Can you elaborate on the dangers of neoprene? I used to use my neoprene kayaking gloves, but recently switched to the atlas. However, my GF still prefers the neoprene. I don’t recall having a friction issue with the neoprene.
  9. ratagonia

    ratagonia

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    It depends on the thickness of the neoprene, and what the gripping surface is like, but most of the ones I have used have enough BULK that it makes feeling and squeezing the rope quite difficult. Add to that a kinda slick surface (maybe), and what you have is something that does not work. Having cold hands would not help.

    YMMV You might have a specific glove that works.

    Tom
  10. Mike Rogers

    Mike Rogers

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    Location:
    Vermont
  11. Mike Rogers

    Mike Rogers

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    (sorry about the apparent double post--is there a way to delete?)
  12. wsbpress

    wsbpress

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    Location:
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    These are my new go-to gloves for cold water:
    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00403NP3C

    [​IMG]
    They have a nice rubbery textured grip in the palm and they are not too bulky to tightly grip a wet 8mm rope. I have had no problems rappelling in these. Prior to using them in-canyon I tested them in an ice-bath in my sink and my hands were nice and comfy down to the low thirties.

    I've tried a few other types of neo gloves that were either impossible to grip the rope with or had poorly sealed seams and were not warm enough. I have yet to try the dishwasher glove combo so I can offer no comparison at this point. I tried the U.S. Divers Comfo 2mm and I found that those were not warm enough in the mid-forty degree temp range but the grip was decent.
  13. ratagonia

    ratagonia

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    Stevee B and wsbpress like this.
  14. wsbpress

    wsbpress

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    Oh... PowerGrab

    That makes more sense. This one got pretty trashed in-canyon:
    upload_2015-6-24_14-8-51.
    ratagonia likes this.
  15. townsend

    townsend

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    I wonder if you got "trench foot", a term that originally goes back to trench warfare in World War I? Wikipedia is your friend.
  16. Kuenn

    Kuenn

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    I'm using this glove of late, so far it's been impressive.

    Pros: Very light weight, great finger dexterity, acceptable protection, doesn't absorb water, breathable material, under $7.
    Cons: Not a winter glove.

    [​IMG]
    Memphis N96797 Ninja BNF Glove
    15 Gauge Nylon/Spandex Shell
  17. ratagonia

    ratagonia

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    Location:
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    But... but you use a RACK, which has very different dynamics than what we use. We (well, ME) sometimes use a "lot of glove" if we don't get the friction right, whereas your rack is always adjustable. HOW IS THE FRICTION on that glove?

    T
  18. Kuenn

    Kuenn

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    Friction was good; rappelling, scrambling, stemming, etc. And I could operate the camera without removing it. :thumbsup:

    Actually, last time I wore THIS glove rappelling, I was on the SQUWREL. Very happy with its performance (gloves and squwrel). It would not be a good long rap glove, but I'm usually leather (brake-hand) when I know there's going to be significant heat.

    This model (15 gauge) is quite thin - light, so it wouldn't provide much heat protection. The mfg also makes a 13 and 10 gauge (heavier gloves), same basic style. And who wouldn't want to wear a glove with Ninja on it...gotta be an endorsement!
    Last edited: Jun 25, 2015
  19. 2065toyota

    2065toyota

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    After Ram's advice, this last trip through Heaps I used a dishwashing glove (forgot rubber bands), and the grey Atlas. It was a perfect combination of warmth and gripping ability.
    Ram likes this.
  20. Stevee B

    Stevee B

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    The key with thick neoprenes is to get the kayaking kind with pre-articulated fingers. I used a pair of 5mm for awhile and they were the ticket for winter descents of Kolob, Imlay, etc. Not only could I control my rappels well, I could tie and untie knots without having to take them off. They wore holes quickly but even with many holes and becoming practically fingerless, they provided a surprising amount of warmth and had a reasonable useful life. I had NRS, I believe, but will check out those MECs for sure.

    I've yet to try Ram's dishwashing / atlas (or Powergrab) combo but plan to, pretty hard to beat that price point if it works even halfway well.
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