Send us a suggestion!

Geminid Meteor Shower

Discussion in 'Archives - Yahoo Canyons Group' started by RAM, Dec 6, 2010.

  1. RAM

    RAM Guest

    http://science.nasa.gov/science-news/science-at-nasa/2010/06dec_geminids/

    Interesting read. Another sky show coming

    Geminid Meteor Shower Defies Explanation

    Dec. 6, 2010: The Geminid meteor shower, which peaks this year on Dec. 13th and 14th, is the most intense meteor shower of the year. It lasts for days, is rich in fireballs, and can be seen from almost any point on Earth.

    It's also NASA astronomer Bill Cooke's favorite meteor shower—but not for any of the reasons listed above.

    "The Geminids are my favorite," he explains, "because they defy explanation."

    Most meteor showers come from comets, which spew ample meteoroids for a night of 'shooting stars.' The Geminids are different. The parent is not a comet but a weird rocky object named 3200 Phaethon that sheds very little dusty debris—not nearly enough to explain the Geminids.

    "Of all the debris streams Earth passes through every year, the Geminids' is by far the most massive," says Cooke. "When we add up the amount of dust in the Geminid stream, it outweighs other streams by factors of 5 to 500."

    This makes the Geminids the 900-lb gorilla of meteor showers. Yet 3200 Phaethon is more of a 98-lb weakling.

    3200 Phaethon was discovered in 1983 by NASA's IRAS satellite and promptly classified as an asteroid. What else could it be? It did not have a tail; its orbit intersected the main asteroid belt; and its colors strongly resembled that of other asteroids. Indeed, 3200 Phaethon resembles main belt asteroid Pallas so much, it might be a 5-kilometer chip off that 544 km block. Geminids 2010 (impact, 550px) An artist's concept of an impact event on Pallas. Credit: B. E. Schmidt and S. C. Radcliffe of UCLA. [larger image]

    "If 3200 Phaethon broke apart from asteroid Pallas, as some researchers believe, then Geminid meteoroids might be debris from the breakup," speculates Cooke. "But that doesn't agree with other things we know."

    Researchers have looked carefully at the orbits of Geminid meteoroids and concluded that they were ejected from 3200 Phaethon when Phaethon was close to the sun—not when it was out in the asteroid belt breaking up with Pallas. The eccentric orbit of 3200 Phaethon brings it well inside the orbit of Mercury every 1.4 years. The rocky body thus receives a regular blast of solar heating that might boil jets of dust into the Geminid stream.

    To test the hypothesis, researchers turned to NASA's twin STEREO spacecraft, which are designed to study solar activity. Coronagraphs onboard STEREO can detect sungrazing asteroids and comets, and in June 2009 they detected 3200 Phaethon only 15 solar diameters from the sun's surface.

    What happened next surprised UCLA planetary scientists David Jewitt and Jing Li, who analyzed the data. "3200 Phaethon unexpectedly brightened by a factor of two," they wrote. "The most likely explanation is that Phaethon ejected dust, perhaps in response to a break-down of surface rocks (through thermal fracture and decomposition cracking of hydrated minerals) in the intense heat of the Sun."

    Jewett and Li's "rock comet" hypothesis is compelling, but they point out a problem: The amount of dust 3200 Phaethon ejected during its 2009 sun-encounter added a mere 0.01% to the mass of the Geminid debris stream—not nearly enough to keep the stream replenished over time. Perhaps the rock comet was more active in the past …?

    "We just don't know," says Cooke. "Every new thing we learn about the Geminids seems to deepen the mystery."

    This month Earth will pass through the Geminid debris stream, producing as many as 120 meteors per hour over dark-sky sites. The best time to look is probably between local midnight and sunrise on Tuesday, Dec. 14th, when the Moon is low and the constellation Gemini is high overhead, spitting bright Geminids across a sparkling starry sky.

    Bundle up, go outside, and savor the mystery.

    Author: Dr. Tony Phillips | Credit: Science@NASA
  2. RAM

    RAM Guest

    Just a reminder..... Also we have a lunar eclipse, full moon (Duh!) and the winter solstice all converging on the 21st.

    GEMINID METEOR SHOWER: The Geminid meteor shower peaks this year on Dec. 13th and 14th. Forecasters say meteor rates could exceed 100 per hour for observers under dark rural skies. For best results, start your meteor watch on Monday night, Dec. 13th, around midnight. Keep an eye out for Geminids until sunrise on Tuesday, Dec. 14th. There's no special trick to seeing the Geminids. Bundle up for maximum warmth, go outside, lie down and look up. Geminids can appear in any part of the sky, but all their tails will point back to the radiant in the constellation Gemini. Check http://spaceweather.com for updates, images and a sky map.

    --- In Yahoo Canyons Group, "RAM" <adkramoo@...> wrote:
    http://science.nasa.gov/science-news/science-at-nasa/2010/06dec_geminids/
    > Interesting read. Another sky show coming
    Geminid Meteor Shower Defies Explanation
    > Dec. 6, 2010: The Geminid meteor shower, which peaks this year on Dec. 13th and 14th, is the most intense meteor shower of the year. It lasts for days, is rich in fireballs, and can be seen from almost any point on Earth.
    It's also NASA astronomer Bill Cooke's favorite meteor shower—but not for any of the reasons listed above.
    "The Geminids are my favorite," he explains, "because they defy explanation."
    Most meteor showers come from comets, which spew ample meteoroids for a night of 'shooting stars.' The Geminids are different. The parent is not a comet but a weird rocky object named 3200 Phaethon that sheds very little dusty debris—not nearly enough to explain the Geminids.
    "Of all the debris streams Earth passes through every year, the Geminids' is by far the most massive," says Cooke. "When we add up the amount of dust in the Geminid stream, it outweighs other streams by factors of 5 to 500."
    This makes the Geminids the 900-lb gorilla of meteor showers. Yet 3200 Phaethon is more of a 98-lb weakling.
    3200 Phaethon was discovered in 1983 by NASA's IRAS satellite and promptly classified as an asteroid. What else could it be? It did not have a tail; its orbit intersected the main asteroid belt; and its colors strongly resembled that of other asteroids. Indeed, 3200 Phaethon resembles main belt asteroid Pallas so much, it might be a 5-kilometer chip off that 544 km block. > Geminids 2010 (impact, 550px) > An artist's concept of an impact event on Pallas. Credit: B. E. Schmidt and S. C. Radcliffe of UCLA. [larger image]
    "If 3200 Phaethon broke apart from asteroid Pallas, as some researchers believe, then Geminid meteoroids might be debris from the breakup," speculates Cooke. "But that doesn't agree with other things we know."
    Researchers have looked carefully at the orbits of Geminid meteoroids and concluded that they were ejected from 3200 Phaethon when Phaethon was close to the sun—not when it was out in the asteroid belt breaking up with Pallas. The eccentric orbit of 3200 Phaethon brings it well inside the orbit of Mercury every 1.4 years. The rocky body thus receives a regular blast of solar heating that might boil jets of dust into the Geminid stream.
    To test the hypothesis, researchers turned to NASA's twin STEREO spacecraft, which are designed to study solar activity. Coronagraphs onboard STEREO can detect sungrazing asteroids and comets, and in June 2009 they detected 3200 Phaethon only 15 solar diameters from the sun's surface.
    What happened next surprised UCLA planetary scientists David Jewitt and Jing Li, who analyzed the data. "3200 Phaethon unexpectedly brightened by a factor of two," they wrote. "The most likely explanation is that Phaethon ejected dust, perhaps in response to a break-down of surface rocks (through thermal fracture and decomposition cracking of hydrated minerals) in the intense heat of the Sun."
    Jewett and Li's "rock comet" hypothesis is compelling, but they point out a problem: The amount of dust 3200 Phaethon ejected during its 2009 sun-encounter added a mere 0.01% to the mass of the Geminid debris stream—not nearly enough to keep the stream replenished over time. Perhaps the rock comet was more active in the past …?
    "We just don't know," says Cooke. "Every new thing we learn about the Geminids seems to deepen the mystery."
    This month Earth will pass through the Geminid debris stream, producing as many as 120 meteors per hour over dark-sky sites. The best time to look is probably between local midnight and sunrise on Tuesday, Dec. 14th, when the Moon is low and the constellation Gemini is high overhead, spitting bright Geminids across a sparkling starry sky.
    Bundle up, go outside, and savor the mystery.
    > Author: Dr. Tony Phillips | Credit: Science@NASA >
  3. aj.outdoors

    aj.outdoors Guest

    Ram,

    Thanks for giving the space/star/meteor info e-mails. I appreciate them (wanted you to know some folks were reading and appreciating them, in case you got any flack for sending them...)

    --- In Yahoo Canyons Group, "RAM" <adkramoo@...> wrote:
    Just a reminder..... Also we have a lunar eclipse, full moon (Duh!) and the winter solstice all converging on the 21st.
    GEMINID METEOR SHOWER: The Geminid meteor shower peaks this year on Dec. 13th > and 14th. Forecasters say meteor rates could exceed 100 per hour for observers > under dark rural skies. For best results, start your meteor watch on Monday > night, Dec. 13th, around midnight. Keep an eye out for Geminids until sunrise > on Tuesday, Dec. 14th. There's no special trick to seeing the Geminids. Bundle > up for maximum warmth, go outside, lie down and look up. Geminids can appear in > any part of the sky, but all their tails will point back to the radiant in the > constellation Gemini. Check http://spaceweather.com for updates, images and a > sky map.
    > --- In Yahoo Canyons Group, "RAM" <adkramoo@> wrote:

    http://science.nasa.gov/science-news/science-at-nasa/2010/06dec_geminids/

    > Interesting read. Another sky show coming

    Geminid Meteor Shower Defies Explanation


    Dec. 6, 2010: The Geminid meteor shower, which peaks this year on Dec. 13th and 14th, is the most intense meteor shower of the year. It lasts for days, is rich in fireballs, and can be seen from almost any point on Earth.

    It's also NASA astronomer Bill Cooke's favorite meteor shower—but not for any of the reasons listed above.

    "The Geminids are my favorite," he explains, "because they defy explanation."

    Most meteor showers come from comets, which spew ample meteoroids for a night of 'shooting stars.' The Geminids are different. The parent is not a comet but a weird rocky object named 3200 Phaethon that sheds very little dusty debris—not nearly enough to explain the Geminids.

    "Of all the debris streams Earth passes through every year, the Geminids' is by far the most massive," says Cooke. "When we add up the amount of dust in the Geminid stream, it outweighs other streams by factors of 5 to 500."

    This makes the Geminids the 900-lb gorilla of meteor showers. Yet 3200 Phaethon is more of a 98-lb weakling.

    3200 Phaethon was discovered in 1983 by NASA's IRAS satellite and promptly classified as an asteroid. What else could it be? It did not have a tail; its orbit intersected the main asteroid belt; and its colors strongly resembled that of other asteroids. Indeed, 3200 Phaethon resembles main belt asteroid Pallas so much, it might be a 5-kilometer chip off that 544 km block.
    Geminids 2010 (impact, 550px)
    An artist's concept of an impact event on Pallas. Credit: B. E. Schmidt and S. C. Radcliffe of UCLA. [larger image]

    "If 3200 Phaethon broke apart from asteroid Pallas, as some researchers believe, then Geminid meteoroids might be debris from the breakup," speculates Cooke. "But that doesn't agree with other things we know."

    Researchers have looked carefully at the orbits of Geminid meteoroids and concluded that they were ejected from 3200 Phaethon when Phaethon was close to the sun—not when it was out in the asteroid belt breaking up with Pallas. The eccentric orbit of 3200 Phaethon brings it well inside the orbit of Mercury every 1.4 years. The rocky body thus receives a regular blast of solar heating that might boil jets of dust into the Geminid stream.

    To test the hypothesis, researchers turned to NASA's twin STEREO spacecraft, which are designed to study solar activity. Coronagraphs onboard STEREO can detect sungrazing asteroids and comets, and in June 2009 they detected 3200 Phaethon only 15 solar diameters from the sun's surface.

    What happened next surprised UCLA planetary scientists David Jewitt and Jing Li, who analyzed the data. "3200 Phaethon unexpectedly brightened by a factor of two," they wrote. "The most likely explanation is that Phaethon ejected dust, perhaps in response to a break-down of surface rocks (through thermal fracture and decomposition cracking of hydrated minerals) in the intense heat of the Sun."

    Jewett and Li's "rock comet" hypothesis is compelling, but they point out a problem: The amount of dust 3200 Phaethon ejected during its 2009 sun-encounter added a mere 0.01% to the mass of the Geminid debris stream—not nearly enough to keep the stream replenished over time. Perhaps the rock comet was more active in the past …?

    "We just don't know," says Cooke. "Every new thing we learn about the Geminids seems to deepen the mystery."

    This month Earth will pass through the Geminid debris stream, producing as many as 120 meteors per hour over dark-sky sites. The best time to look is probably between local midnight and sunrise on Tuesday, Dec. 14th, when the Moon is low and the constellation Gemini is high overhead, spitting bright Geminids across a sparkling starry sky.

    Bundle up, go outside, and savor the mystery.


    Author: Dr. Tony Phillips | Credit: Science@NASA
    >
  4. Felicia

    Felicia Guest

    I love this information! I plan to be out tonight. :)

    Sent from my iPhone

    On Dec 13, 2010, at 7:18 AM, "aj.outdoors" ajmail2011@gmail.com> wrote:

    > Ram,
    Thanks for giving the space/star/meteor info e-mails. I appreciate them (wanted you to know some folks were reading and appreciating them, in case you got any flack for sending them...)
    > --- In Yahoo Canyons Group, "RAM" <adkramoo@...> wrote: >
    > Just a reminder..... Also we have a lunar eclipse, full moon (Duh!) and the winter solstice all converging on the 21st. >
    > GEMINID METEOR SHOWER: The Geminid meteor shower peaks this year on Dec. 13th >> and 14th. Forecasters say meteor rates could exceed 100 per hour for observers >> under dark rural skies. For best results, start your meteor watch on Monday >> night, Dec. 13th, around midnight. Keep an eye out for Geminids until sunrise >> on Tuesday, Dec. 14th. There's no special trick to seeing the Geminids. Bundle >> up for maximum warmth, go outside, lie down and look up. Geminids can appear in >> any part of the sky, but all their tails will point back to the radiant in the >> constellation Gemini. Check http://spaceweather.com for updates, images and a >> sky map. >

    > --- In Yahoo Canyons Group, "RAM" <adkramoo@> wrote: >>
    >> http://science.nasa.gov/science-news/science-at-nasa/2010/06dec_geminids/
    >
    >> Interesting read. Another sky show coming >>
    >> Geminid Meteor Shower Defies Explanation >>
    >
    >> Dec. 6, 2010: The Geminid meteor shower, which peaks this year on Dec. 13th and 14th, is the most intense meteor shower of the year. It lasts for days, is rich in fireballs, and can be seen from almost any point on Earth. >>
    >> It's also NASA astronomer Bill Cooke's favorite meteor shower—but not for any of the reasons listed above. >>
    >> "The Geminids are my favorite," he explains, "because they defy explanation." >>
    >> Most meteor showers come from comets, which spew ample meteoroids for a night of 'shooting stars.' The Geminids are different. The parent is not a comet but a weird rocky object named 3200 Phaethon that sheds very little dusty debris—not nearly enough to explain the Geminids. >>
    >> "Of all the debris streams Earth passes through every year, the Geminids' is by far the most massive," says Cooke. "When we add up the amount of dust in the Geminid stream, it outweighs other streams by factors of 5 to 500." >>
    >> This makes the Geminids the 900-lb gorilla of meteor showers. Yet 3200 Phaethon is more of a 98-lb weakling. >>
    >> 3200 Phaethon was discovered in 1983 by NASA's IRAS satellite and promptly classified as an asteroid. What else could it be? It did not have a tail; its orbit intersected the main asteroid belt; and its colors strongly resembled that of other asteroids. Indeed, 3200 Phaethon resembles main belt asteroid Pallas so much, it might be a 5-kilometer chip off that 544 km block. >>> Geminids 2010 (impact, 550px) >>> An artist's concept of an impact event on Pallas. Credit: B. E. Schmidt and S. C. Radcliffe of UCLA. [larger image] >>
    >> "If 3200 Phaethon broke apart from asteroid Pallas, as some researchers believe, then Geminid meteoroids might be debris from the breakup," speculates Cooke. "But that doesn't agree with other things we know." >>
    >> Researchers have looked carefully at the orbits of Geminid meteoroids and concluded that they were ejected from 3200 Phaethon when Phaethon was close to the sun—not when it was out in the asteroid belt breaking up with Pallas. The eccentric orbit of 3200 Phaethon brings it well inside the orbit of Mercury every 1.4 years. The rocky body thus receives a regular blast of solar heating that might boil jets of dust into the Geminid stream. >>
    >> To test the hypothesis, researchers turned to NASA's twin STEREO spacecraft, which are designed to study solar activity. Coronagraphs onboard STEREO can detect sungrazing asteroids and comets, and in June 2009 they detected 3200 Phaethon only 15 solar diameters from the sun's surface. >>
    >> What happened next surprised UCLA planetary scientists David Jewitt and Jing Li, who analyzed the data. "3200 Phaethon unexpectedly brightened by a factor of two," they wrote. "The most likely explanation is that Phaethon ejected dust, perhaps in response to a break-down of surface rocks (through thermal fracture and decomposition cracking of hydrated minerals) in the intense heat of the Sun." >>
    >> Jewett and Li's "rock comet" hypothesis is compelling, but they point out a problem: The amount of dust 3200 Phaethon ejected during its 2009 sun-encounter added a mere 0.01% to the mass of the Geminid debris stream—not nearly enough to keep the stream replenished over time. Perhaps the rock comet was more active in the past …? >>
    >> "We just don't know," says Cooke. "Every new thing we learn about the Geminids seems to deepen the mystery." >>
    >> This month Earth will pass through the Geminid debris stream, producing as many as 120 meteors per hour over dark-sky sites. The best time to look is probably between local midnight and sunrise on Tuesday, Dec. 14th, when the Moon is low and the constellation Gemini is high overhead, spitting bright Geminids across a sparkling starry sky. >>
    >> Bundle up, go outside, and savor the mystery. >>
    >
    >> Author: Dr. Tony Phillips | Credit: Science@NASA >>



    ---
    When you post, please change the Subject appropriately, to make reading and searching easier. You can use the following abbreviations: TRIP = Trip Report; BETA = Canyon Beta; PARTNER = Partner and/or Rides; ETHICS = Ethics; TECH = Technical Questions and Tips; BIZ = E Group Business; SALE = Stuff for Sale. Please use a Tilde ~ after the abbreviation, so we know you are coding for us, such as:
    Subject: BIZ~ New Abbreviation List - working?
    To change your delivery options, go to the Canyons Egroup page on yahoo: > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/canyons/
    > This will require logging into Yahoo. Click on the &amp;amp;quot;Edit My > Membership&amp;amp;quot; link, and change your delivery option. Press &amp;amp;quot;Save > Changes&amp;amp;quot;.
    DAILY DIGEST OPTION will deliver one email > to you each day summarizing that day's messages.
    WEB ONLY OPTION will not deliver email; you > must visit the web site to view messages. Groups Links
    >
  5. tj_wetherell

    tj_wetherell Guest

    Just a link to some good graphics/info on the Dec 20/21 lunar eclipse.... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/December_2010_lunar_eclipse

    -tom(w)

    --- In Yahoo Canyons Group, "RAM" <adkramoo@...> wrote:
    Just a reminder..... Also we have a lunar eclipse, full moon (Duh!) and the winter solstice all converging on the 21st.
  6. Dan

    Dan Guest

    i can't believe it's been almost 3 years since the last eclipse... crazy! i stayed up all night in 2008 to see the whole thing, and would again to see this one, except we can't see it in nepal! shame!

    photos from the 2008 event - http://danransom.com/blog/index.php?showimage=467

    --- In Yahoo Canyons Group, "tj_wetherell" <tj_wetherell@...> wrote:
    Just a link to some good graphics/info on the Dec 20/21 lunar eclipse.... > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/December_2010_lunar_eclipse
    > -tom(w)
    --- In Yahoo Canyons Group, "RAM" <adkramoo@> wrote:

    Just a reminder..... Also we have a lunar eclipse, full moon (Duh!) and the winter solstice all converging on the 21st. >
  7. Ram,

    Thanks for the Geminids tip. My daughter and I were up at 3:45am to watch and saw about two dozen great meteors. Even with a bit of cloud cover it was a great display from here.

    Dean

    --- In Yahoo Canyons Group, "Dan" <carpeybiggs@...> wrote:
    i can't believe it's been almost 3 years since the last eclipse... crazy! i stayed up all night in 2008 to see the whole thing, and would again to see this one, except we can't see it in nepal! shame!
    photos from the 2008 event - http://danransom.com/blog/index.php?showimage=467
    > --- In Yahoo Canyons Group, "tj_wetherell" <tj_wetherell@> wrote:

    Just a link to some good graphics/info on the Dec 20/21 lunar eclipse....
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/December_2010_lunar_eclipse

    > -tom(w)

    --- In Yahoo Canyons Group, "RAM" <adkramoo@> wrote:


    Just a reminder..... Also we have a lunar eclipse, full moon (Duh!) and the winter solstice all converging on the 21st.
    >
  8. RAM

    RAM Guest

    I was up and driving at 4:15 AM and stopped several times between then and first light near 7ish. The lights of Fort Collins dimmed the show, but I still saw a few good ones. You got it better up the hill where you are. ;-) R

    --- In Yahoo Canyons Group, "evergreen_dean" <dbrooks@...> wrote:
    Ram,
    Thanks for the Geminids tip. My daughter and I were up at 3:45am to watch and saw about two dozen great meteors. Even with a bit of cloud cover it was a great display from here.
    Dean
    --- In Yahoo Canyons Group, "Dan" <carpeybiggs@> wrote:

    i can't believe it's been almost 3 years since the last eclipse... crazy! i stayed up all night in 2008 to see the whole thing, and would again to see this one, except we can't see it in nepal! shame!

    photos from the 2008 event - http://danransom.com/blog/index.php?showimage=467

    > --- In Yahoo Canyons Group, "tj_wetherell" <tj_wetherell@> wrote:


    Just a link to some good graphics/info on the Dec 20/21 lunar eclipse....
    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/December_2010_lunar_eclipse


    > -tom(w)


    --- In Yahoo Canyons Group, "RAM" <adkramoo@> wrote:



    Just a reminder..... Also we have a lunar eclipse, full moon (Duh!) and the winter solstice all converging on the 21st.
  9. TomJones

    TomJones Guest

    Jeesh, Dan. Ya did it to me again... just WASTED another 45 minutes looking at pictures. I was even digging the football pics!

    Tom

    --- In Yahoo Canyons Group, "Dan" <carpeybiggs@...> wrote:
    i can't believe it's been almost 3 years since the last eclipse... crazy! i stayed up all night in 2008 to see the whole thing, and would again to see this one, except we can't see it in nepal! shame!
    photos from the 2008 event -

    > http://danransom.com/blog/index.php?showimage=467
  10. Dan

    Dan Guest

    hahaha. sorry for the tangent sir, but mr wetherall spurred some good memories for me! my apologies for the random sentiment, stop reading now if you don't want any more of it...

    reminds me of the good ol' days back in happy valley, when i had a real job, could find actual paying gigs with a camera, and got regular paychecks. my life took quite a turn of events right around that eclipse. had a lot of things on my mind during that night (an unintended coincidence of timing), and very soon thereafter I quit my "real" job and went to alaska.

    i remember thinking at the time, while freezing my ass off and trying to keep my camera lens from fogging up in the february cold, "i have to stay awake for this because the next one isn't for THREE YEARS, you don't want to miss it..." three years seemed like an eternity.

    and thus, at the time, it kind of felt like a big deal to me. one of those "ok, you have a couple years to play, then it's time to figure all this out and act like a grown up"

    i must say, i've greatly enjoyed the time since the last eclipse, in no small part because of a lot of folks on this list. but you've all done nothing to help me figure out how to act like a grown up.

    good times, they go so fast...



    "It is a blessed thing that in every age some one has had individuality enough and courage enough to stand by his own convictions, -- some one who had the grandeur to say his say. I believe it was Magellan who said, 'The church says the earth is flat; but I have seen its shadow on the moon, and I have more confidence even in a shadow than in the church.' On the prow of his ship were disobedience, defiance, scorn, and success."

    Individuality, Robert Green Ingersoll
  11. Yeah, yeah, whatever Dan. Just be back for FreezeFest, OK?

    ;)

    Loved the quote, by the way.

    Kev

    --- In Yahoo Canyons Group, "Dan" <carpeybiggs@...> wrote:
    reminds me of the good ol' days

    ......

    > good times, they go so fast... >
  12. Randi

    Randi Guest

    Dan, what a nice little peek into the back-story of your "meandering" spirit - who would have thunk that it was somehow influenced by that fateful eclipse of the moon a few years back?! Ummm...if that's indeed what you're saying.   Now it almost sounds like this new eclipse of the moon might have it's way with you again! Are you saying in a roundabout way that you're ready to settle down and figure stuff out (like a job/a family/kids maybe?)   I love the quote you posted! ♥ And I love the following sentiment too - written as a speech then adapted into a song. They used to play it on the radio back in the 70's or 80's - you might have heard it already....   Anyhow - I thought of it after reading your post.     Everybody’s Free (To wear sunscreen)  http://www.generationterrorists.com/quotes/sunscreen.html     Back story behind the song – if you’re interested:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wear_Sunscreen     PS: Growing up (like sanity) is over-rated I'm sure! ;)       --- On Tue, 12/14/10, Dan carpeybiggs@hotmail.com> wrote:

    From: Dan carpeybiggs@hotmail.com> Subject: [from Canyons Group] Re: Geminid Meteor Shower To: Yahoo Canyons Group Date: Tuesday, December 14, 2010, 11:34 PM

     



    hahaha. sorry for the tangent sir, but mr wetherall spurred some good memories for me! my apologies for the random sentiment, stop reading now if you don't want any more of it...

    reminds me of the good ol' days back in happy valley, when i had a real job, could find actual paying gigs with a camera, and got regular paychecks. my life took quite a turn of events right around that eclipse. had a lot of things on my mind during that night (an unintended coincidence of timing), and very soon thereafter I quit my "real" job and went to alaska.

    i remember thinking at the time, while freezing my ass off and trying to keep my camera lens from fogging up in the february cold, "i have to stay awake for this because the next one isn't for THREE YEARS, you don't want to miss it..." three years seemed like an eternity.

    and thus, at the time, it kind of felt like a big deal to me. one of those "ok, you have a couple years to play, then it's time to figure all this out and act like a grown up"

    i must say, i've greatly enjoyed the time since the last eclipse, in no small part because of a lot of folks on this list. but you've all done nothing to help me figure out how to act like a grown up.

    good times, they go so fast...

    "It is a blessed thing that in every age some one has had individuality enough and courage enough to stand by his own convictions, -- some one who had the grandeur to say his say. I believe it was Magellan who said, 'The church says the earth is flat; but I have seen its shadow on the moon, and I have more confidence even in a shadow than in the church.' On the prow of his ship were disobedience, defiance, scorn, and success."

    Individuality, Robert Green Ingersoll
  13. RAM

    RAM Guest

Similar Threads: Geminid Meteor
Forum Title Date
General Discussion GEMINID METEOR SHOWER Dec 10, 2016
General Discussion GEMINID METEOR SHOWER Dec 1, 2014
General Discussion The Geminid meteor shower is underway. Dec 13, 2013
Archives - Yahoo Canyons Group The 2011 Geminid Meteor Shower Dec 12, 2011
Archives - Yahoo Canyons Group How cold....was Geminid Meteor Shower Dec 8, 2009
Archives - Yahoo Canyons Group The 2009 Geminid Meteor Shower Dec 8, 2009