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escalante tr

Discussion in 'Archives - Yahoo Canyons Group' started by Anton Solovyev, Oct 21, 2009.

  1. A partner and I were in Escalante area this last weekend.

    Day 1:

    We started at Coyote Gulch trailhead, went to Jacob Hamblin arch, then across Coyote Gulch (up the arch) and to the Bobway. We found Bobway completely dry and a nice and easy way to Escalante. From the Bobway we went up Escalante to the mouth of Ichabod canyon (average bushwhacking).

    Again, we found Ichabod completely dry and choked with huge stones for at least a few hundred meters. It did not look particularly beautiful or inviting. At that point we reconsidered our plan to get on Stevens bench and explore the four canyons on the east side, since likely we would not find any water there.

    We hiked further up Escalante and camped at the mouth of Fools canyon. Fools did not have any flow, but the spring in the beginning had some water. Nice camping.

    Day 2:

    Went up Fools canyon to the cow trail exit. There were several pools of water and some intermittent flow along the way. The waterfall at the big pool was not. The most difficult bushwhack of the whole trip through sections of tamarisk and tall grass.

    After exiting Fools we hiked cross country back to Coyote and to the trailhead. There was a "spring" marked on USGS map between Fools and Coyote and sure enough there was a deep pothole with some water.

    Day 3:

    Relocated down Hole in The Rock Road to the Llewellyn canyon parking. Went down the north fork of L. (a nice little slot) and to the camp at the last exit. Llewellyn is a nice little canyon with some water flowing, a section of water over slickrock and a small waterfall. Met some hikers/boaters from the Lake Powell side.

    I hiked to the lake to the point where I could see Navajo mountain (within about a mile from Glen canyon).

    We found two good panels of petroglyphs as mentioned in Kelsey's guide.

    Day 4:

    We exited Llewellyn and hiked over to Cottonwood. Left packs and hiked down canyon to see some ruins. There's good trail all the way and signs of people coming from the lake side. The ruins were as described in guide books, but the petroglyphs we could not locate.

    Then we went up Cottonwood via a small slot with one difficult upclimb and back to the car.

    ***

    All in all, the weather was beautiful and the conditions were very dry. Also, we concluded that perhaps the best way to see Ichabod/Hydra/Fold/Shofar/Beryl is as described in Steve Allen's book, via upper Stevens canyon.

    --

    Anton Solovyev
  2. j b

    j b Guest

    Thanks for this TR. Would you say that Fools is worth dayhiking up from the mouth, at least for a while? Or too much work for the scenery? I'm pretty curious about a lot of that country, especially upstream to the Georgie's Camp/Fold area.

    Jeff



    ________________________________ From: Anton Solovyev anton@solovyev.com> To: Yahoo Canyons Group Sent: Wed, October 21, 2009 4:19:32 PM Subject: [from Canyons Group] Escalante TR

    A partner and I were in Escalante area this last weekend.
  3. j b wrote:

    > Thanks for this TR. Would you say that Fools is worth dayhiking up from the mouth, at least for a while? Or too much work for the scenery? I'm pretty curious about a lot of that country, especially upstream to the Georgie's Camp/Fold area.

    The best parts in my opinion are actually close to the cow trail exit. A long sleeves/long pants, a smaller pack and the bushwhacking would be a lot easier. I'd say yes, it's a nice canyon. Please keep in mind this was my first trip to Escalante, so I have a very limited experience.

    --

    Anton Solovyev
  4. Just got back from Escalante, did Neon and Choprock as a part of a group. Camped at the mouth of Fence canyon and day hiked Neon on Friday and Choprock on Saturday.

    1. The bugs are vicious. Green flies near the river are not so bad. Cedar gnats are unbelievable. Don't underestimate, it's as bad as gnats in tundra. They swarm, land, run and bite leaving huge bumps (depending on your individual reaction). Prefer eyes, ears and hair line. The only times when it's somewhat manageable is at night (when there's none), near the river and if there's any breeze. Also, while you are moving it's ok, but if you stop they will swarm and eat you alive.

    2. Neon. Great, but the bugs were present and were eating us at every stop, very bad around the pothole bolt rappel. Downright dangerous, since it was hard to think well. Then, right before the final rappel they were mostly gone and there were none at all in the Golden Cathedral. Recommend against doing it in there conditions.

    Crossing Escalante is very difficult in some places. Shorter and smaller people were being swept by the current.

    3. Choprock. Started with the first light, sometime during the approach gnats woke up and were killing us at a stop while descending a cliff band. Then after one or two initial obstacles in the canyon the bugs were completely gone not to be seen again until Escalante. The canyon was truly amazing. Superbly beautiful, long swims, clear cold water, subway sections, greenery. The sun was shining almost vertically, beautiful, warm. There was no grim section, only riparian and happy. I am on the cold side, had a 4/3 full wetsuit and was fine, warming up in the hot sand. There was one spot where we had to go under a log with water up to our ears. An amazing day. Highly recommended if you can avoid being in the open during the day light hours.

    We floated down Escalante following Tom's advice, nice.

    P.S. A group of three and a dog were camped next to us at the Fence canyon mouth.

    P.P.S. So, when do these bugs disappear?

    --

    Anton Solovyev
  5. davewyo1

    davewyo1 Guest

    Some folks say that they "burn off" in the heat of the summer. I can tell you they are around to some extent in September and sometimes into October, but they "freeze off" after that. :) Dave

    --- In Yahoo Canyons Group, Anton Solovyev <anton@...> wrote: > P.P.S. So, when do these bugs disappear? > Anton Solovyev
  6. phil

    phil Guest

    Higher water = longer season. There will be more pools and therefor more breeding sites. Gonna be an epic bug year across the desert.

    Phillip

    --- In Yahoo Canyons Group, "davewyo1" <davewyo1@...> wrote:
    Some folks say that they "burn off" in the heat of the summer. > I can tell you they are around to some extent in September and sometimes into October, but they "freeze off" after that. > :) > Dave
    --- In Yahoo Canyons Group, Anton Solovyev <anton@> wrote:
    P.P.S. So, when do these bugs disappear?
    Anton Solovyev >
  7. Cedar gnats seem to actually not like water and to like heat and direct sun.

    This:

    http://watchingtheworldwakeup.blogspot.com/2009/05/road-trip-part-3-all-about-cedar-gnats.html

    Has a good write up on them.

    == What we call Cedar Gnats in Southern Utah are specifically 9 different (maybe more) species of Culicoides. They hatch in (non-flying) larval form from eggs laid in Spring or early Summer in fissures in the bark of Utah Juniper trees, and crawl around the fissures eating plant debris and algae. The larvae overwinter in the bark fissures until the following Spring when they pupate (like what a caterpillar does to become a moth or butterfly) into flying adult gnats. ===

    He says mid-May to July 1, I am curious about people's experiences. Forgot to mention: a mosquito net around your head and long sleeves/pants definitely help. As in: you are still not comfortable, but at least not running crazy in circles on a tiny ledge. BTW, my ears right now are twice the normal size and thickness :)

    Thanks!

    phil wrote:

    > Higher water = longer season. There will be more pools and therefor more breeding sites. Gonna be an epic bug year across the desert.
    Phillip
    --- In Yahoo Canyons Group, "davewyo1" <davewyo1@...> wrote: >> Some folks say that they "burn off" in the heat of the summer. >> I can tell you they are around to some extent in September and sometimes into October, but they "freeze off" after that. >> :) >> Dave >
    > --- In Yahoo Canyons Group, Anton Solovyev <anton@> wrote: >>> P.P.S. So, when do these bugs disappear? >>> Anton Solovyev

    --

    Anton Solovyev
  8. Mike Schasch

    Mike Schasch Guest

    We were hiking into Coyote Gulch for a couple day adventure yesterday and called it after 3 miles due to hordes of horse flys. Never gave up on a trip because of bugs before that, ridiculous! They seemed to really enjoy biting my partner, and didn't start biting me until I started to fear them.

    --- In Yahoo Canyons Group, Anton Solovyev <anton@...> wrote:
    Just got back from Escalante, did Neon and Choprock as a part of a group. Camped > at the mouth of Fence canyon and day hiked Neon on Friday and Choprock on Saturday.
    1. The bugs are vicious. Green flies near the river are not so bad. Cedar gnats > are unbelievable. Don't underestimate, it's as bad as gnats in tundra. They > swarm, land, run and bite leaving huge bumps (depending on your individual > reaction). Prefer eyes, ears and hair line. The only times when it's somewhat > manageable is at night (when there's none), near the river and if there's any > breeze. Also, while you are moving it's ok, but if you stop they will swarm and > eat you alive.
    > 2. Neon. Great, but the bugs were present and were eating us at every stop, very > bad around the pothole bolt rappel. Downright dangerous, since it was hard to > think well. Then, right before the final rappel they were mostly gone and there > were none at all in the Golden Cathedral. Recommend against doing it in there > conditions.
    Crossing Escalante is very difficult in some places. Shorter and smaller people > were being swept by the current.
    > 3. Choprock. Started with the first light, sometime during the approach gnats > woke up and were killing us at a stop while descending a cliff band. Then after > one or two initial obstacles in the canyon the bugs were completely gone not to > be seen again until Escalante. The canyon was truly amazing. Superbly beautiful, > long swims, clear cold water, subway sections, greenery. The sun was shining > almost vertically, beautiful, warm. There was no grim section, only riparian and > happy. I am on the cold side, had a 4/3 full wetsuit and was fine, warming up in > the hot sand. There was one spot where we had to go under a log with water up to > our ears. An amazing day. Highly recommended if you can avoid being in the open > during the day light hours.
    We floated down Escalante following Tom's advice, nice.
    > P.S. A group of three and a dog were camped next to us at the Fence canyon mouth.
    P.P.S. So, when do these bugs disappear?
    --
    Anton Solovyev >
  9. Mike,

    Mike Schasch wrote:

    > We were hiking into Coyote Gulch for a couple day adventure yesterday and called it after 3 miles due to hordes of horse flys. Never gave up on a trip because of bugs before that, ridiculous! They seemed to really enjoy biting my partner, and didn't start biting me until I started to fear them.

    Aha! I totally understand.

    This would be what Tom calls "green flies", AKA small horse flies, I think (?) We were under attack near the mouth of Choprock. However, a wetsuit and some shade were helping. Those things went directly for our calves.

    How were the cedar gnats? I think near Coyote it's lower and more barren, so there should not be breeding ground for gnats.

    I wonder if DEET helps against horse flies. I seem to remember it's supposed to.

    --

    Anton Solovyev
  10. j b

    j b Guest

    Lots of interesting stuff on that blog, especially some of the astronomy posts. Note that the author suspects that these "cedar" gnats can fly at least 300 feet from the nearest juniper, and suspects that they might not always require juniper trees. I can absolutely confirm this, having nearly lost my grip on sanity during a week in the field where we were at least 10 miles from the nearest tree of any kind. At least some species are perfectly happy to live out their life cycles in sagebrush.

    Jeff



    ________________________________ From: Anton Solovyev anton@solovyev.com> To: Yahoo Canyons Group Sent: Mon, June 13, 2011 10:49:38 AM Subject: Re: [from Canyons Group] Re: escalante tr

    Cedar gnats seem to actually not like water and to like heat and direct sun.

    This:

    http://watchingtheworldwakeup.blogspot.com/2009/05/road-trip-part-3-all-about-cedar-gnats.html

    Has a good write up on them.

    == What we call Cedar Gnats in Southern Utah are specifically 9 different (maybe more) species of Culicoides. They hatch in (non-flying) larval form from eggs laid in Spring or early Summer in fissures in the bark of Utah Juniper trees, and crawl around the fissures eating plant debris and algae. The larvae overwinter in the bark fissures until the following Spring when they pupate (like what a caterpillar does to become a moth or butterfly) into flying adult gnats. ===

    He says mid-May to July 1, I am curious about people's experiences. Forgot to mention: a mosquito net around your head and long sleeves/pants definitely help.

    As in: you are still not comfortable, but at least not running crazy in circles on a tiny ledge. BTW, my ears right now are twice the normal size and thickness :)

    Thanks!

    phil wrote:

    > Higher water = longer season. There will be more pools and therefor more >breeding sites. Gonna be an epic bug year across the desert.
    Phillip
    --- In Yahoo Canyons Group, "davewyo1" <davewyo1@...> wrote: >> Some folks say that they "burn off" in the heat of the summer. >> I can tell you they are around to some extent in September and sometimes into >>October, but they "freeze off" after that. >> :) >> Dave >
    > --- In Yahoo Canyons Group, Anton Solovyev <anton@> wrote: >>> P.P.S. So, when do these bugs disappear? >>> Anton Solovyev

    --

    Anton Solovyev
  11. Mike Schasch

    Mike Schasch Guest

    Deet was not working AT ALL. They would hover around our legs waiting for us to slow down just a bit and then strike. I sprayed them directly with deet and they would not move. Didn't see too many gnats, we were preoccupied with the flys.

    --- In Yahoo Canyons Group, Anton Solovyev <anton@...> wrote:
    Mike,
    Mike Schasch wrote:
    > We were hiking into Coyote Gulch for a couple day adventure yesterday and called it after 3 miles due to hordes of horse flys. Never gave up on a trip because of bugs before that, ridiculous! They seemed to really enjoy biting my partner, and didn't start biting me until I started to fear them.
    Aha! I totally understand.
    This would be what Tom calls "green flies", AKA small horse flies, I think (?) > We were under attack near the mouth of Choprock. However, a wetsuit and some > shade were helping. Those things went directly for our calves.
    How were the cedar gnats? I think near Coyote it's lower and more barren, so > there should not be breeding ground for gnats.
    I wonder if DEET helps against horse flies. I seem to remember it's supposed to.
    --
    Anton Solovyev >
  12. Randi

    Randi Guest

    I'm gonna be back-packing out that way in a couple of weeks. I've never encountered these horrible creatures - should I plan on wearing full body covering, including gloves? And should I purchase a bug net for my head?   I'm expecting a pleasant hike. I'd hate to feel like I'm in a war-zone the entire time while battling these blood-sucking demons and invisible gnats!   Does anyone have recommendations as far as a head-cover?

    --- On Mon, 6/13/11, Mike Schasch mikedstyles@yahoo.com> wrote:

    From: Mike Schasch mikedstyles@yahoo.com> Subject: [from Canyons Group] Re: escalante tr To: Yahoo Canyons Group Date: Monday, June 13, 2011, 2:36 PM

     



    Deet was not working AT ALL. They would hover around our legs waiting for us to slow down just a bit and then strike. I sprayed them directly with deet and they would not move. Didn't see too many gnats, we were preoccupied with the flys.

    --- In Yahoo Canyons Group, Anton Solovyev <anton@...> wrote:
    Mike,
    Mike Schasch wrote:
    > We were hiking into Coyote Gulch for a couple day adventure yesterday and called it after 3 miles due to hordes of horse flys. Never gave up on a trip because of bugs before that, ridiculous! They seemed to really enjoy biting my partner, and didn't start biting me until I started to fear them.
    Aha! I totally understand.
    This would be what Tom calls "green flies", AKA small horse flies, I think (?) > We were under attack near the mouth of Choprock. However, a wetsuit and some > shade were helping. Those things went directly for our calves.
    How were the cedar gnats? I think near Coyote it's lower and more barren, so > there should not be breeding ground for gnats.
    I wonder if DEET helps against horse flies. I seem to remember it's supposed to.
    --
    Anton Solovyev >
  13. j b

    j b Guest

    The gnats/no-see-ums seem to target the upper body. Collarline, hairline (and scalp if you have short hair), hatband/visor-line, and the ears. But they also enjoy flying into the ear canal, nostrils, and eyes when especially thick. Even though they don't really bite inside your ears, having 'em rattle around in there is, to understate things, a little exasperating. I once wore earplugs all day in a seemingly futile attempt to keep them out. A headnet is good insurance--when you need it, nothing else will do. Get one with a ring that keeps the net out from your face. Gloves seem unnecessary. Good luck!

    Jeff

    ________________________________ From: Randi advntr_inxs@yahoo.com> To: Yahoo Canyons Group Sent: Mon, June 13, 2011 5:18:42 PM Subject: Re: [from Canyons Group] Re: escalante tr

    I'm gonna be back-packing out that way in a couple of weeks. I've never encountered these horrible creatures - should I plan on wearing full body covering, including gloves? And should I purchase a bug net for my head?

    I'm expecting a pleasant hike. I'd hate to feel like I'm in a war-zone the entire time while battling these blood-sucking demons and invisible gnats!

    Does anyone have recommendations as far as a head-cover?
  14. I was just in the North Wash last weekend and I had the same problem. They were eating me alive. I was constantly swatting, and hearing that high pitched buzz enter my ears. I think I even sniffed a few, and swallowed a few as well. I have red spots all over my arms and THEY ITCH!!!! I even borrowed some 98% deet spray (which made my lips go numb???) and they still seemed relentless. Is this a new breed of ravenous miniature flying beasts? Our whole group was leaving with their nails digging into their skin like a bunch of crazy dogs!

    Chris

    --- In Yahoo Canyons Group, j b <pofr2004@...> wrote:
    The gnats/no-see-ums seem to target the upper body. Collarline, hairline (and > scalp if you have short hair), hatband/visor-line, and the ears. But they also > enjoy flying into the ear canal, nostrils, and eyes when especially thick. Even > though they don't really bite inside your ears, having 'em rattle around in > there is, to understate things, a little exasperating. I once wore earplugs all > day in a seemingly futile attempt to keep them out. A headnet is good > insurance--when you need it, nothing else will do. Get one with a ring that > keeps the net out from your face. Gloves seem unnecessary. Good luck!
    Jeff
    > ________________________________ > From: Randi <advntr_inxs@...
    To: Yahoo Canyons Group
    Sent: Mon, June 13, 2011 5:18:42 PM > Subject: Re: [from Canyons Group] Re: escalante tr
    I'm gonna be back-packing out that way in a couple of weeks. > I've never encountered these horrible creatures - should I plan on wearing full > body covering, including gloves? And should I purchase a bug net for my head?
    I'm expecting a pleasant hike. I'd hate to feel like I'm in a war-zone the > entire time while battling these blood-sucking demons and invisible gnats!
    Does anyone have recommendations as far as a head-cover?
    >
  15. phil

    phil Guest

    I'm not convinced from this blog that they don't require water. Everything points, when you trace the various species back to their Diptera roots, that they require water/moisture to some level. I found information at the USFS that they actually begin their life cycle in the moist soil below the Juniper.

    Skeptical of his conclusions (wish he had some citations). But it has me curious. Unfortunately, finding accurate entomology information on the interweb can be a fools journey. Might have to pull in Fred, the SUU specialists to find out. Curiosity killed the undergrad.

    Phillip

    --- In Yahoo Canyons Group, Anton Solovyev <anton@...> wrote:
    Cedar gnats seem to actually not like water and to like heat and direct sun.
    This:
    http://watchingtheworldwakeup.blogspot.com/2009/05/road-trip-part-3-all-about-cedar-gnats.html
    > Has a good write up on them.
    == > What we call Cedar Gnats in Southern Utah are specifically 9 different (maybe > more) species of Culicoides. They hatch in (non-flying) larval form from eggs > laid in Spring or early Summer in fissures in the bark of Utah Juniper trees, > and crawl around the fissures eating plant debris and algae. The larvae > overwinter in the bark fissures until the following Spring when they pupate > (like what a caterpillar does to become a moth or butterfly) into flying adult > gnats. > ===
    He says mid-May to July 1, I am curious about people's experiences. Forgot to > mention: a mosquito net around your head and long sleeves/pants definitely help. > As in: you are still not comfortable, but at least not running crazy in circles > on a tiny ledge. BTW, my ears right now are twice the normal size and thickness :)
    Thanks!
    phil wrote:
    > Higher water = longer season. There will be more pools and therefor more breeding sites. Gonna be an epic bug year across the desert.

    Phillip

    --- In Yahoo Canyons Group, "davewyo1" <davewyo1@> wrote:
    > Some folks say that they "burn off" in the heat of the summer.
    > I can tell you they are around to some extent in September and sometimes into October, but they "freeze off" after that.
    > :)
    > Dave

    >> --- In Yahoo Canyons Group, Anton Solovyev <anton@> wrote:
    >> P.P.S. So, when do these bugs disappear?
    >> Anton Solovyev
    > --
    Anton Solovyev >
  16. Pete

    Pete Guest

    Sorry. Sent it prematurely.

    doesn't last as many washings as the commercially treated clothing.

    Locals in Blanding suggested Skin-So-Soft (Avon) for the gnats you find down around Comb Ridge. A guy who worked road crew one summer said SSS was the only thing that worked on them (I'm talking about the ones that bite and leave red welts that itch for a week or more). I bought some individual towelettes of SSS, but haven't had a chance to try them.

    Pete

    --- In Yahoo Canyons Group, "Pete" <PKlein95014@...> wrote:
    For the deer flies (green flies), wear lightweight pants while you're > hiking. They tend to stay below your waist and not bother bare > arms or face. They tend to collect in specific areas and not in others. > Camp accordingly.
    Other things to try in general -- bug repellent clothing, esp. hats. > You can spray your clothing with permethrin, but it doesn't last
    --- In Yahoo Canyons Group, j b <pofr2004@> wrote:

    The gnats/no-see-ums seem to target the upper body. Collarline, hairline (and
    scalp if you have short hair), hatband/visor-line, and the ears. But they also
    enjoy flying into the ear canal, nostrils, and eyes when especially thick. Even
    though they don't really bite inside your ears, having 'em rattle around in
    there is, to understate things, a little exasperating. I once wore earplugs all
    day in a seemingly futile attempt to keep them out. A headnet is good
    insurance--when you need it, nothing else will do. Get one with a ring that
    keeps the net out from your face. Gloves seem unnecessary. Good luck!

    Jeff


    ________________________________
    From: Randi <advntr_inxs@
    > To: Yahoo Canyons Group
    > Sent: Mon, June 13, 2011 5:18:42 PM
    Subject: Re: [from Canyons Group] Re: escalante tr

    I'm gonna be back-packing out that way in a couple of weeks.
    I've never encountered these horrible creatures - should I plan on wearing full
    body covering, including gloves? And should I purchase a bug net for my head?

    I'm expecting a pleasant hike. I'd hate to feel like I'm in a war-zone the
    entire time while battling these blood-sucking demons and invisible gnats!

    Does anyone have recommendations as far as a head-cover?


    >
  17. KennethS

    KennethS Guest

    It sends shivers down my spine just hearing the mention of deer flies. About 20 years ago I did my first trip down the Paria after a very wet Spring. Things were good until the last 10 miles. I think the DEET did work but it was a statistical thing, they just kept coming and for some the DEET was like steak sauce. Now I wear long sleeves, long light pants, light gloves, and mosquito netting. Yes, scarred for life. I must say though I have never seen so many active lizards as I saw on that hike.

    Ken

    --- In Yahoo Canyons Group, "phil" <Happyfeet00@...> wrote:
    I'm not convinced from this blog that they don't require water. Everything points, when you trace the various species back to their Diptera roots, that they require water/moisture to some level. I found information at the USFS that they actually begin their life cycle in the moist soil below the Juniper.
    Skeptical of his conclusions (wish he had some citations). But it has me curious. Unfortunately, finding accurate entomology information on the interweb can be a fools journey. Might have to pull in Fred, the SUU specialists to find out. Curiosity killed the undergrad.
    Phillip
    --- In Yahoo Canyons Group, Anton Solovyev <anton@> wrote:

    Cedar gnats seem to actually not like water and to like heat and direct sun.

    This:

    http://watchingtheworldwakeup.blogspot.com/2009/05/road-trip-part-3-all-about-cedar-gnats.html

    > Has a good write up on them.

    ==
    What we call Cedar Gnats in Southern Utah are specifically 9 different (maybe
    more) species of Culicoides. They hatch in (non-flying) larval form from eggs
    laid in Spring or early Summer in fissures in the bark of Utah Juniper trees,
    and crawl around the fissures eating plant debris and algae. The larvae
    overwinter in the bark fissures until the following Spring when they pupate
    (like what a caterpillar does to become a moth or butterfly) into flying adult
    gnats.
    ===

    He says mid-May to July 1, I am curious about people's experiences. Forgot to
    mention: a mosquito net around your head and long sleeves/pants definitely help.
    As in: you are still not comfortable, but at least not running crazy in circles
    on a tiny ledge. BTW, my ears right now are twice the normal size and thickness :)

    Thanks!

    phil wrote:

    > Higher water = longer season. There will be more pools and therefor more breeding sites. Gonna be an epic bug year across the desert.


    Phillip


    --- In Yahoo Canyons Group, "davewyo1" <davewyo1@> wrote:
    >> Some folks say that they "burn off" in the heat of the summer.
    >> I can tell you they are around to some extent in September and sometimes into October, but they "freeze off" after that.
    >> :)
    >> Dave
    >

    > --- In Yahoo Canyons Group, Anton Solovyev <anton@> wrote:
    >>> P.P.S. So, when do these bugs disappear?
    >>> Anton Solovyev


    --

    Anton Solovyev
    >
  18. Randi wrote:

    > I'm gonna be back-packing out that way in a couple of weeks. > I've never encountered these horrible creatures - should I plan on wearing full body covering, including gloves? And should I purchase a bug net for my head?
    I'm expecting a pleasant hike. I'd hate to feel like I'm in a war-zone the entire time while battling these blood-sucking demons and invisible gnats!
    Does anyone have recommendations as far as a head-cover?

    Same observations as the other posters: the flies seem to bite mostly the calves and lower body, the cedar gnats attack face, ears, hair line, but also the edges of knee and elbow pads. Red welts, itch like crazy. Bring Cortizone cream :)

    I suspect long pants/sleeves would be too warm in this weather. The gnats can't bite through even thin clothing. Perhaps lightest Patagonia long underwear? I have not tried it.

    One of our group had long jones/sleeves and a mosquito net. He said it worked fairly well. He was able to function unlike the rest of us. He also mentioned you need a visor to keep the netting off your face.

    Another big thing: the gnats appear to be very location and weather dependent. We had swarms at a cliff band above Choprock and even at the first downclimb, but NONE 100 yards down canyon. There are no gnats after dark.

    I spent an hour sitting outside at the intersection of the Hole In The Rock Road and Hwy 12, there was a light breeze and almost no gnats at all. A one or two during long lulls, that's it.

    We observed a very few gnats at the Kiva Kofeehouse (a restaurant on Hwy 12 above Escalante). We ate outside no problem.

    Same at a swimming hole on Fremont River in Capitol Reef: a one or two gnats, but not a problem at all.

    --

    Anton Solovyev
  19. mmdcp1

    mmdcp1 Guest

    One add-on. The mosquito nets are made for mosquitos. The gnats are smaller, and some do get through. If you could somehow find a finer mesh net, it would work better.

    Marty

    --- In Yahoo Canyons Group, Anton Solovyev <anton@...> wrote:
    Randi wrote:
    > I'm gonna be back-packing out that way in a couple of weeks.
    I've never encountered these horrible creatures - should I plan on wearing full body covering, including gloves? And should I purchase a bug net for my head?

    I'm expecting a pleasant hike. I'd hate to feel like I'm in a war-zone the entire time while battling these blood-sucking demons and invisible gnats!

    Does anyone have recommendations as far as a head-cover?
    Same observations as the other posters: the flies seem to bite mostly the calves > and lower body, the cedar gnats attack face, ears, hair line, but also the edges > of knee and elbow pads. Red welts, itch like crazy. Bring Cortizone cream :)
    I suspect long pants/sleeves would be too warm in this weather. The gnats can't > bite through even thin clothing. Perhaps lightest Patagonia long underwear? I > have not tried it.
    One of our group had long jones/sleeves and a mosquito net. He said it worked > fairly well. He was able to function unlike the rest of us. He also mentioned > you need a visor to keep the netting off your face.
    Another big thing: the gnats appear to be very location and weather dependent. > We had swarms at a cliff band above Choprock and even at the first downclimb, > but NONE 100 yards down canyon. There are no gnats after dark.
    I spent an hour sitting outside at the intersection of the Hole In The Rock Road > and Hwy 12, there was a light breeze and almost no gnats at all. A one or two > during long lulls, that's it.
    We observed a very few gnats at the Kiva Kofeehouse (a restaurant on Hwy 12 > above Escalante). We ate outside no problem.
    Same at a swimming hole on Fremont River in Capitol Reef: a one or two gnats, > but not a problem at all.
    --
    Anton Solovyev >
  20. Randi

    Randi Guest

    Thanks guys - I think I'm gonna order this head net. One reviewer says it doesn't work for no-seeums but otherwise it looks good. I thought this reviewers comment was funny! And your comment too Anton "He was able to function unlike the rest of us." ~ ;0)   Comments about Sea To Summit Head Net: I did a two day solo in Southern Yosemite, last July. Nine miles straight of Mosquito Hell. I put the net on over my cap and life was tolerable. Seriously, I would have been forced to turn around without it. I sprayed 100% Deet everywhere and melted my sunglasses and my watch, but not my head net. Snagged it in the bushes and not a pile or a pull. Light, tiny, durableDeeret proof anindispensablele when needed. That buzzing noise was ringing in my ears for days...Bottom Line Yes, I would recommend this to a friend.

     

    --- On Tue, 6/14/11, mmdcp1 mmdcp@q.com> wrote:

    From: mmdcp1 mmdcp@q.com> Subject: [from Canyons Group] Re: escalante tr To: Yahoo Canyons Group Date: Tuesday, June 14, 2011, 6:58 AM

     



    One add-on. The mosquito nets are made for mosquitos. The gnats are smaller, and some do get through. If you could somehow find a finer mesh net, it would work better.

    Marty

    --- In Yahoo Canyons Group, Anton Solovyev <anton@...> wrote:
    Randi wrote:
    > I'm gonna be back-packing out that way in a couple of weeks.
    I've never encountered these horrible creatures - should I plan on wearing full body covering, including gloves? And should I purchase a bug net for my head?

    I'm expecting a pleasant hike. I'd hate to feel like I'm in a war-zone the entire time while battling these blood-sucking demons and invisible gnats!

    Does anyone have recommendations as far as a head-cover?
    Same observations as the other posters: the flies seem to bite mostly the calves > and lower body, the cedar gnats attack face, ears, hair line, but also the edges > of knee and elbow pads. Red welts, itch like crazy. Bring Cortizone cream :)
    I suspect long pants/sleeves would be too warm in this weather. The gnats can't > bite through even thin clothing. Perhaps lightest Patagonia long underwear? I > have not tried it.
    One of our group had long jones/sleeves and a mosquito net. He said it worked > fairly well. He was able to function unlike the rest of us. He also mentioned > you need a visor to keep the netting off your face.
    Another big thing: the gnats appear to be very location and weather dependent. > We had swarms at a cliff band above Choprock and even at the first downclimb, > but NONE 100 yards down canyon. There are no gnats after dark.
    I spent an hour sitting outside at the intersection of the Hole In The Rock Road > and Hwy 12, there was a light breeze and almost no gnats at all. A one or two > during long lulls, that's it.
    We observed a very few gnats at the Kiva Kofeehouse (a restaurant on Hwy 12 > above Escalante). We ate outside no problem.
    Same at a swimming hole on Fremont River in Capitol Reef: a one or two gnats, > but not a problem at all.
    --
    Anton Solovyev >