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Tech Tip: Question Double ended rope bags (rope holding tubes?), why?

Discussion in 'Tech Tips and Gear' started by RobbyB, Sep 28, 2020.

  1. RobbyB

    RobbyB

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  2. Rapterman

    Rapterman

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    Double ended rope bags can be handy for alternating/swinging leads on long routes with hanging stations where the belay rope is being bagged.
    At the belay, instead of untying and swapping rope ends, the bag can just be flipped over (close the top first!) and the follower turned leader
    can go... It is even more versatile if the tube can be split with a zipper or velcro.
    For class C canyons? With water dynamics better be VERY robust closures on both ends....
    :D
  3. RobbyB

    RobbyB

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    I think I am misunderstanding your first example, can you explain more? I have not heard of climbers using rope bags in this way.
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  4. NevadaSlots

    NevadaSlots

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    Norhex outta Portland makes them too, and they look fairly robust, though not terribly. https://www.norhex.net/shop/doubledipper

    I also don't quite understand Rapterman's example, it seems like a double-ended bag would come in handy when NOT swapping leads on a climb, as the follower's end would be at the top of the bag when they get to the belay, but when the leader is leading again then the stack/bag has to be flipped. A bag that does not have a split down the middle would make climbing transitions more difficult as it would force the leader to untie to get his/her end (forcing a separate connection point from a standard clove hitch to their fig 8) at the bottom of the bag to start stacking then flipping later. Hopefully, that sorta makes sense...makes sense in my head.

    A double-ended bag in a canyoneering setting would come in super handy for top belayed rappels. As you could set your rope length and stone the rope off one end of the bag then flip the bag and clip the rappeler into that end and belay them down. All the while keeping things tidy out of the flow. You could also do the same set up rigged as a contingency, with its obvious drawbacks/advantages. It could also be slick for some a class C drop where you wanted to rig twin but you wanted both ends at water level for quick off rappel and escape. I could also see it coming in handy in a guided scenario when the guide might need a longer safety tether and to have good visual or communication with the clients/guests as they could grab the other end of the rope and clove themselves in extra long or munter themselves out over or close to the edge for a better position. I’m sure there are a lot more, just got to think of them.

    I am by no means an expert on double-ended bags nor at class c canyons, just some thoughts. I've had a Norhex double-dipper in the works for a while now, when it arrives I can give more input on its usefulness in Utah-Esque canyons if wanted.
    Last edited: Sep 29, 2020
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  5. Brian in SLC

    Brian in SLC Brian in SLC

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    Yeah...not sure I'm understanding either. Most lead climbers on long routes don't carry a rope bag in my experience. If they do, they'd be loading it as the follower comes up the route, which, would be blunt end first for the follower who leads at the next pitch. The rope would already be stacked for the follower to go. Only thing that kinda makes sense is if the leader were to lead in blocks or the whole route.

    But, the bag is listed as a canyon bag. I think it might make sense if someone wanted to swap ends for wear and tear concerns.
  6. Rapterman

    Rapterman

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    Sorry, you are correct!
    I meant the leader leading in blocks, as my partner often does
    Because I am old, fat, and chicken
    :eek:
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  7. hobo_climber

    hobo_climber

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    I've got one (the access gear model) and it almost instantly became my go-to rope management device...

    Very burly, as all Pete's gear is. Well thought out design with good, strong closures at both ends. Floats with 60m of 10mm and drains like a sieve!

    Why though?

    Has more uses in a guiding sense than recreationally... easy to flip it and provide a belay. cleaner solution for running dual releasable systems to get the group moving faster.

    But where it shines IMO it just makes rope management easy. I can now set a retrievable traverse line out to an anchor & rig that drop from the same rope, without having to dig through the bag for the bottom end, or have any concern that using the bottom end is going to cause any headaches/tangles. I can then re-stack "the top" end easily prior to descending as the LMAR.
    ratagonia and Rapterman like this.
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