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Dogbone -- anyone?

Discussion in 'Tech Tips and Gear' started by townsend, Sep 5, 2018.

  1. townsend

    townsend

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    Location:
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    I recently purchased a Black Diamond 12cm dogbone, like the one on the left (the longer one is 18cm).

    [​IMG]

    Has anyone found a use for this in canyoneering? I was thinking it might useful -- on occasion -- to serve to extend the rappel device. Why would one want to extend the rappel device, you might add? Well, if (and that is the operative word) you are using an autobloc as some sort of self-belay, you would want to make sure the autobloc and the rappel device don't come into contact with one another.

    I do know that you could just chain 2-3 carabiners together as well, but I think the dogbone is a better solution, should one want some mild extension of the rappel device. It weighs next to nothing and is more than sufficiently strong. And its cheap as well (3.95 for the 12cm). Just wonderin' . . . :)
  2. srosander01

    srosander01

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    I use the 18 cm version of the dogbone for the exact reason you are thinking about, I extend my rappelling device with it. I use two quick links, one attaches to my belay loop and the other provides an attachment point for my carabiner and ATS. I have found that this is the most comfortable set up for me on pretty much all rappels. I like the way it enables me to use two hands on the brake line, and if I only use one hand on brake, it allows me to hold on to something other than the device or the loaded line which tends to get hot while in descent.

    The major drawback that I've experienced, so far, is that the device can get caught up on an overhanging ledge when starting some rappels. I've managed to deal with those situations as they arise, so I haven't really looked to change my set up because of this drawback. Give it a try, you won't know if you like it until then.
    townsend likes this.
  3. Morgan

    Morgan

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    Location:
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    It can also be a useful tool for ascending past an overhang. The dogbone can be prefastened to ascender, and then when you reach the overhang you clip your harness into the dogbone to minimize the distance between ascender and harness.
  4. The Dread Pirate Roberts

    The Dread Pirate Roberts

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    I use a PAS to extend my device and I agree with your statement. I would add one thing that I have found to be a draw back: you can get in the habit of using both hands as brake hands and when you do have to bring the device in (not extend it) that can be a bad habit.
    Last edited: Sep 7, 2018
  5. ratagonia

    ratagonia

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    Would you mind qualifying your answer by making it clear WHERE you do most of your canyoneering?

    Thanks.

    Tom
  6. srosander01

    srosander01

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    Zion, The swell, Moab, Robber's Roost, North Wash, Escalante, some waterfalls here in SLC, and I like to practice techniques in the tree outside of my house as well. I've found the dogbone, as an extension device to be very useful for me, personally, in multiple types of canyons and multiple styles of rappels.
    ratagonia likes this.
  7. srosander01

    srosander01

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    Well I am not one without bad habits. My wife can attest to that. Out of curiosity, what situation have you run into that you have to bring the device in (not extend it) 18 more cm?
    Rapterman likes this.
  8. hank moon

    hank moon lovely ligatures

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    I prefer using both hands on the brake line, and have no trouble when not extended. I'm reading that you do - or have I misinterpreted?
    Rapterman likes this.
  9. Rapterman

    Rapterman

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    Like Hank, I also (usually, unless fending off a wall, debris, etc) prefer using two hands on the brake line and rig
    the CRITR close to my harness- much easier to hip start/ clear sharp lips at the start of raps.
    Have also found it can be harder (for me) to adjust friction if the device is set high.
    Do not like any 'helmet strap/hair suction device' near my helmet strap...
    :D
    ratagonia likes this.
  10. Jeff Schaber

    Jeff Schaber

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    I've never considered/thought of using two hands on the brake line and am having trouble picturing that. Any of you have a pic to share?
  11. srosander01

    srosander01

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  12. Rapterman

    Rapterman

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    Typically
    On lower angle I will use one hand for brake
    then as the rappel goes steep or vertical, then two hands.
    With devices designed with adjustable friction 'on the fly' (Critr, Sqwurel, Hoodoo, etc) the classic stance
    of bracing the brake hand outside the hip can be changed up to negotiate awkward canyon obstacles.
    :)
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