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Body of missing hiker found - Little Wild Horse

Discussion in 'Archives - Yahoo Canyons Group' started by gbrandthart, Apr 27, 2009.

  1. gbrandthart

    gbrandthart Guest

    Emery County » The Colorado woman, 54, disappeared five months ago in a remote canyon. By Erin Alberty

    Salt Lake Tribune Updated:04/27/2009 04:56:39 PM MDT

    The body of a Colorado woman was found this weekend in a remote canyon in Emery County five months after she disappeared on a hiking trip to Moab.

    Three hikers on Saturday found the body of Rose Backus, 54, in a drainage of a tributary that drops into Upper Chute Canyon near Baptist Draw, said Emery County Sheriff Lamar Guymon.

    "It looks like she got to a point where she couldn't continue down and she couldn't get back up where she came from," Guymon said. Backus was found near a 40- to 50-foot drop-off.

    Medical examiners determined she died of exposure and did not indicate she had any broken bones or debilitating injuries, Guymon said.

    Backus, of Glenwood Springs, Colo., was reported missing from Moab 16 days after she was believed to be hiking in Little Wild Horse and Bell canyons, Guymon said. Her car was at the parking lot of the Little Wild Horse Canyon trailhead.

    She apparently hiked up Bell Canyon and took a wrong turn where the canyon opens up, Guymon said. She likely continued too far west and turned into the drainage rather than into Little Wild Horse Canyon.

    She was carrying a book with a map that "doesn't give you any real idea where you should turn," Guymon said.

    She had no ropes and no food and was wearing a light parka, Guymon said.

    There is no sign of foul play, Guymon said.

    http://www.sltrib.com/ci_12239335

    Brandt
  2. adkramoo

    adkramoo Guest

    --- In Yahoo Canyons Group, "gbrandthart" <gbrandthart@...> wrote:
    Emery County » The Colorado woman, 54, disappeared five months ago in a remote canyon. SNIP > She was carrying a book with a map that "doesn't give you any real idea where you should turn," Guymon said.

    Ummmm?
  3. Ryan Hull

    Ryan Hull Guest

    Ummmmm? any guesses on the book? Ummmm, no no shouldn't go there



    To: Yahoo Canyons Group From: adkramoo@aol.com Date: Tue, 28 Apr 2009 01:19:43 &#43;0000 Subject: [from Canyons Group] Re: [NEWS] Body of missing hiker found - Little Wild Horse







    --- In Yahoo Canyons Group, "gbrandthart" <gbrandthart@...> wrote:
    Emery County » The Colorado woman, 54, disappeared five months ago in a remote canyon. SNIP > She was carrying a book with a map that "doesn't give you any real idea where you should turn," Guymon said.

    Ummmm?









    _______________ Rediscover Hotmail®: Now available on your iPhone or BlackBerry http://windowslive.com/RediscoverHotmail?ocid=TXT_TAGLM_WL_HM_Rediscover_Mobile2_042009
  4. Shaun

    Shaun Guest

    So I wasn't the only one that noticed this too.

    Sad way to go. So close too. I wonder how close the search effort came. At least family and friends now know what happened. My best wished to them.

    --- In Yahoo Canyons Group, Ryan Hull <lilyhull12@...> wrote:
    > Ummmmm? any guesses on the book? Ummmm, no no shouldn't go there

    To: Yahoo Canyons Group
    From: adkramoo@... > Date: Tue, 28 Apr 2009 01:19:43 &#43;0000 > Subject: [from Canyons Group] Re: [NEWS] Body of missing hiker found - Little Wild Horse



    --- In Yahoo Canyons Group, "gbrandthart" <gbrandthart@> wrote:

    Emery County » The Colorado woman, 54, disappeared five months ago in a remote canyon. > SNIP
    She was carrying a book with a map that "doesn't give you any real idea where you should turn," Guymon said.
    Ummmm?




    _______________ > Rediscover Hotmail®: Now available on your iPhone or BlackBerry > http://windowslive.com/RediscoverHotmail?ocid=TXT_TAGLM_WL_HM_Rediscover_Mobile2_042009
    > >
  5. gbrandthart

    gbrandthart Guest

    Many years ago on one of my first trips to the Swell I used a book that had not the best of maps to get to the Lower Black Box trailhead. I left I-70 just after dark and on the dirt road stopped to relieve myself. 17 miles later I came to a wet spot in the road. I had driven in a complete circle. I quit using that book...

    Any idea what canyon exactly she was found in? By accident once I entered a canyon between Baptist and the fault exit canyon. It didn't feel right so we started leaving stuff so we could reverse it. It ended at a nice natural bridge and a larger drop into Chute.

    Brandt

    --- In Yahoo Canyons Group, "Shaun" <trackrunner83@...> wrote:
    So I wasn't the only one that noticed this too.
    Sad way to go. So close too. I wonder how close the search effort came. At least family and friends now know what happened. My best wished to them.
    --- In Yahoo Canyons Group, Ryan Hull <lilyhull12@> wrote:


    Ummmmm? any guesses on the book? Ummmm, no no shouldn't go there



    To: Yahoo Canyons Group
    > From: adkramoo@
    Date: Tue, 28 Apr 2009 01:19:43 &#43;0000
    Subject: [from Canyons Group] Re: [NEWS] Body of missing hiker found - Little Wild Horse







    --- In Yahoo Canyons Group, "gbrandthart" <gbrandthart@> wrote:


    Emery County » The Colorado woman, 54, disappeared five months ago in a remote canyon.
    SNIP
    > She was carrying a book with a map that "doesn't give you any real idea where you should turn," Guymon said.

    Ummmm?









    _______________
    Rediscover Hotmail®: Now available on your iPhone or BlackBerry
    http://windowslive.com/RediscoverHotmail?ocid=TXT_TAGLM_WL_HM_Rediscover_Mobile2_042009

    >
    >
  6. Ron Graham

    Ron Graham Guest

    What would you pay to get yourself out of such a fix? $600, or the cost of a PLB? Some people, as we know, would give their right hand in a desperate situation...

    I can't understand why solo hikers don't carry a PLB when exploring new territory. It might not work on some terrain, but at least it gives you an option of last resort.

    In my mind, it's no more "uncool" to carry a PLB on solo hikes in the wilderness than it is to carry an avalanche beacon on potentially unstable snow. Stuff happens. Being prepared was once considered smart.
  7. Malia

    Malia Guest

    Who says wearing an avalanche beacon is uncool?

    --- In Yahoo Canyons Group, "Ron Graham" <dsrtfox@...> wrote:


    In my mind, it's no more "uncool" to carry a PLB on solo hikes in the wilderness than it is to carry an avalanche beacon on potentially unstable snow. Stuff happens. Being prepared was once considered smart. >
  8. billprussic

    billprussic Guest

    Steve Allen's book doesn't have a map.

    --- In Yahoo Canyons Group, Ryan Hull <lilyhull12@...> wrote:
    > Ummmmm? any guesses on the book?
  9. restrac2000

    restrac2000 Guest

    --- In Yahoo Canyons Group, "Ron Graham" <dsrtfox@...> wrote:
    What would you pay to get yourself out of such a fix? $600, or the cost of a PLB? Some people, as we know, would give their right hand in a desperate situation...
    I can't understand why solo hikers don't carry a PLB when exploring new territory. It might not work on some terrain, but at least it gives you an option of last resort.
    In my mind, it's no more "uncool" to carry a PLB on solo hikes in the wilderness than it is to carry an avalanche beacon on potentially unstable snow. Stuff happens. Being prepared was once considered smart. >

    I'm not against PLBs, actually own a spot for my (semi-)technical solo trips. That said I get worried when modern technology is the first thing people jump to. You are right in "being prepared was once considered smart." But that normally started with developing basic skills, like carrying the ten essentials and knowing how to read a map. That seems to be the flaw in her experience, considering she died of exposure with no trauma. We all get lost (or likely will). I have almost dropped into wrong drainages. But knowing the basics of navigation and reading a map (often twice, and very patiently) has always allowed me to backtrack the little distance I needed to get back on trail.

    Being prepared solo often means having a few extras, like a bivy or matches, even on day-trips. I always carry enough clothing and equipment to at minimally "suffer" through a few days of weather and unplanned overnighting. Always taught my students that as well, though how we each enter the backcountry is a personal choice. As we get more and more injuries and fatalities in the backcountry and think it reminds us that the modern "light is right" philosophy is a fairly advanced mantra for skilled individuals. Carry a few extra pounds of gear when we are new, learn the basics, and be prepared for self rescue. Mentally amplify the dangers of solo, out of season day hikes before heading out. Then maybe consider that PLB that is way down at the bottom of your pack, say after injuries or an extra night or two in the woods.

    Only bring it up b/c the two threads floating around have mentioned technology as their main advice. Compass, map, medicine, clothing are all technology too!!! This coming from someone who owns a GPS, PLB and has been SAR rescued once. (though not on solo trip). Didn't end up spending $5000 for rescue b/c lack of modern technology!

    My thoughts.

    Phillip
  10. Tom Jones

    Tom Jones Guest

    --- In Yahoo Canyons Group, "restrac2000" <Happyfeet00@...> wrote:
    I'm not against PLBs, actually own a spot for my (semi-)technical > solo trips. That said I get worried when modern technology is the > first thing people jump to. You are right in "being prepared was > once considered smart." ...

    Strong support.

    "His boy scout training kicked in"...

    Uh, not really. The first thing to do when you get lost is to sit down and stay put, so people can find you; not go wandering around the desert so no one can... Applies in both cases.

    Tom
  11. Troy Ayres

    Troy Ayres Guest

    Is anyone aware of a device similar to "SPOT" (device to notify authorities in case of an emergency in remote environments) that doesn't require an annual or monthly subscription?

    Troy

    On Tue, Apr 28, 2009 at 10:07 PM, Tom Jones ratagonia@gmail.com> wrote:


    > --- In Yahoo Canyons Group <canyons%40yahoogroups.com>, "restrac2000" > <Happyfeet00@...> wrote:

    I'm not against PLBs, actually own a spot for my (semi-)technical
    solo trips. That said I get worried when modern technology is the
    first thing people jump to. You are right in "being prepared was
    once considered smart." ...
    Strong support.
    "His boy scout training kicked in"...
    Uh, not really. The first thing to do when you get lost is to sit down and > stay put, so people can find you; not go wandering around the desert so no > one can... Applies in both cases.
    Tom
    >



    -- Investors Title Insurance Agency, Inc. 8341 South 700 East Sandy, UT 84070 Office: 801.562-8888 Fax: 801.562-9010
  12. Bobby Evans

    Bobby Evans Guest

    I have a spot. I bought it to ease my family's fears about my solo hikes in Cedar Mesa's Canyons. Yearly service is a $150 fee charged to a credit card. Added benefit is that you can hit the "I'm OK button and send the message via email to whomever you wish. Those getting your message get a Google Earth sat photo and a pinpoint indicating the lat-long from where the message was originated, which may take several minutes. Hope this helps. Watch for promotion where you buy the year's service and get the Spot free.

    --- On Wed, 4/29/09, Troy Ayres troy@investorstitleonline.com> wrote:

    > From: Troy Ayres troy@investorstitleonline.com
    Subject: Re: [from Canyons Group] Re: [NEWS] Body of missing hiker found - Little Wild Horse > To: Yahoo Canyons Group
    Date: Wednesday, April 29, 2009, 6:46 AM > Is anyone aware of a device similar to "SPOT" > (device to notify authorities > in case of an emergency in remote environments) that > doesn't require an > annual or monthly subscription?
    Troy
    On Tue, Apr 28, 2009 at 10:07 PM, Tom Jones > ratagonia@gmail.com> wrote:


    > --- In Yahoo Canyons Group
    <canyons%40yahoogroups.com>, "restrac2000"
    <Happyfeet00@...> wrote:


    I'm not against PLBs, actually own a spot for > my (semi-)technical
    > solo trips. That said I get worried when modern > technology is the
    > first thing people jump to. You are right in > "being prepared was
    > once considered smart." ...

    Strong support.

    "His boy scout training kicked in"...

    Uh, not really. The first thing to do when you get > lost is to sit down and
    stay put, so people can find you; not go wandering > around the desert so no
    one can... Applies in both cases.

    Tom




    -- > Investors Title Insurance Agency, Inc. > 8341 South 700 East > Sandy, UT 84070 > Office: 801.562-8888 > Fax: 801.562-9010
    >
  13. A.J.

    A.J. Guest

    I totally agree Phillip. Completely relying on technology is not a good thing. GPS/Spot gets dropped and you are SOL. I believe one needs to have the skills to get thier own tush out of a jam without technology. That said, I don't mind an extra safety margin that some of today's technology gives us. Difficult balance there though. I'm strongly against mandating things like PLB's (as was discussed on Mt. Hood.) Gives people a false sense of security that if they screw up, someone will come rescue them.

    I've worked on several SAR teams, and the first rule has always been that you don't needlessly endanger yourself or your team to rescue another. So, for the folks that were on Hood, unprepared for the white out they were in; they could push that Spot button as much as they wanted. Folks weren't going to risk avalanche danger in white out conditions to get them; they will have to at least be prepared for and wait for the weather to clear... (Not trying to be mean, just realistic... Moral is to carry enough to make sure you aren't a story on the evening news. Oh, and practice your "rope making" out of sticks skills. ;)

    But that's just my opinion; I could be wrong... ;)

    > I'm not against PLBs, actually own a spot for my (semi-)technical solo trips. That said I get worried when modern technology is the first thing people jump to. You are right in "being prepared was once considered smart." But that normally started with developing basic skills, like carrying the ten essentials and knowing how to read a map. That seems to be the flaw in her experience, considering she died of exposure with no trauma. We all get lost (or likely will). I have almost dropped into wrong drainages. But knowing the basics of navigation and reading a map (often twice, and very patiently) has always allowed me to backtrack the little distance I needed to get back on trail.
    Being prepared solo often means having a few extras, like a bivy or matches, even on day-trips. I always carry enough clothing and equipment to at minimally "suffer" through a few days of weather and unplanned overnighting. Always taught my students that as well, though how we each enter the backcountry is a personal choice. As we get more and more injuries and fatalities in the backcountry and think it reminds us that the modern "light is right" philosophy is a fairly advanced mantra for skilled individuals. Carry a few extra pounds of gear when we are new, learn the basics, and be prepared for self rescue. Mentally amplify the dangers of solo, out of season day hikes before heading out. Then maybe consider that PLB that is way down at the bottom of your pack, say after injuries or an extra night or two in the woods.
    Only bring it up b/c the two threads floating around have mentioned technology as their main advice. Compass, map, medicine, clothing are all technology too!!! This coming from someone who owns a GPS, PLB and has been SAR rescued once. (though not on solo trip). Didn't end up spending $5000 for rescue b/c lack of modern technology!
    My thoughts.
    Phillip >
  14. Ron Graham

    Ron Graham Guest


    I'm not against PLBs, actually own a spot for my (semi-)technical solo trips. That said I get worried when modern technology is the first thing people jump to. You are right in "being prepared was once considered smart." But that normally started with developing basic skills, like carrying the ten essentials and knowing how to read a map. That seems to be the flaw in her experience, considering she died of exposure with no trauma. We all get lost (or likely will). I have almost dropped into wrong drainages. But knowing the basics of navigation and reading a map (often twice, and very patiently) has always allowed me to backtrack the little distance I needed to get back on trail.
    Being prepared solo often means having a few extras, like a bivy or matches, even on day-trips. I always carry enough clothing and equipment to at minimally "suffer" through a few days of weather and unplanned overnighting. Always taught my students that as well, though how we each enter the backcountry is a personal choice. As we get more and more injuries and fatalities in the backcountry and think it reminds us that the modern "light is right" philosophy is a fairly advanced mantra for skilled individuals. Carry a few extra pounds of gear when we are new, learn the basics, and be prepared for self rescue. Mentally amplify the dangers of solo, out of season day hikes before heading out. Then maybe consider that PLB that is way down at the bottom of your pack, say after injuries or an extra night or two in the woods.
    Only bring it up b/c the two threads floating around have mentioned technology as their main advice. Compass, map, medicine, clothing are all technology too!!! This coming from someone who owns a GPS, PLB and has been SAR rescued once. (though not on solo trip). Didn't end up spending $5000 for rescue b/c lack of modern technology!
    My thoughts.
    Phillip >

    From one Boy Scout to another (?): absolutely agree on preparedness for contingencies of any level. Note that I mentioned "option of last resort" when discussing the value of a PLB. I've carried one for about six years on solo trips deep into the backcountry, and never had a situation yet in which I ever contemplated using it. What bothers me is a spirit of bravado I often encounter when mentioning the value of one, as if one assumes anyone carrying a PLB would turn to it before exhausting other self-rescue skills and equipment. Does anyone really know of any situations in which that has happened? I haven't encountered any. On the other hand, I regularly read of numerous cases in Accidents in North American Mountaineering and other accident summaries where having that kind of option of last resort, especially in regards to solo hikers, would definitely have saved lives. If you asked any of the people who ran out of other options to rescue themselves, "Would you part with $600 at this point to get your butt out of here?", I'd bet most would say, "Yes." It's like the matter of whether you should buy a life insurance policy if you have needy dependents - you don't buy the policy with the actual intention of collecting on it, but if the worst case occurs to you, it becomes a particularly tragic situation if you didn't have the foresight to carry one.

    Beyond options of last resort for a solo hiker, consider this: if you and a buddy were doing a remote canyon like Imlay where cell phone coverage is spotty and encounters with other hikers are very infrequent but you can find a place to send up a satellite transmission, what would you do if rock fall or a bad stumble on a really sharp object opened up one of your buddy's arteries? You could use all of your self-rescue training to try to control the bleeding and the onset of shock, but at some point, you're not going to get your buddy out of the situation without additional rescue help. You will look like a hero double timing it out of the canyon on your own, but the response will probably be a retrieval rather than a rescue. Although it won't look as heroic in the papers, keeping the compress on the wound, staying with your friend, and sending up an emergency signal with a GPS coordinate might make all the difference whether you go canyoneering with that buddy again.
  15. A.J.

    A.J. Guest

    > What bothers me is a spirit of bravado I often encounter when > mentioning the value of one, as if one assumes anyone carrying a > PLB would turn to it before exhausting other self-rescue skills > and equipment. Does anyone really know of any situations in which > that has happened? I haven't encountered any.

    Yes, many. Many SAR rescues do happen without (in my opinion) being necessary. Mostly still from cell phones (from my experience) but I'm sure PLB ones will increase as they get more commonplace. There was a call last year on Longs where a group was "too tired to go on" and wanted a helicopter to pick them up. Rangers hiked up and hiked down with the group. (It's a trail, and hiking down is fairly easy.)

    The person who went into Middle leprechaun last year and sat down on a ledge; being fished out by a haul system off a helicopter skid. First off, he shouldn't have been in there in the first place; but he could have gone on in my opinion. It would have been painful (don't know if he had knee/elbow pads but he definitely left some blood on the walls), but it wasn't life threatening.

    There's plenty more. One of my favorites is a "mountaineer" (very loosely used) calls for rescue on a climb. A helicopter comes and gets said hiker. When the helicopter takes off, the hiker sees how close he was to the summit, and wants the helicopter to take him back so he can finish the summit. Expecting that the helicopter will wait for him and fly him down afterwards...

    > ...I regularly read of numerous cases in Accidents in North > American Mountaineering and other accident summaries where having > that kind of option of last resort, especially in regards to solo > hikers, would definitely have saved lives. > ... > than a rescue. Although it won't look as heroic in the papers, > keeping the compress on the wound, staying with your friend, and > sending up an emergency signal with a GPS coordinate might make > all the difference whether you go canyoneering with that buddy > again.

    I totally agree. PLB's can be effective and useful when used as a last case resort / insurance policy
  16. Ron Graham

    Ron Graham Guest


    Yes, many. Many SAR rescues do happen without (in my opinion) being necessary. Mostly still from cell phones (from my experience) but I'm sure PLB ones will increase as they get more commonplace. There was a call last year on Longs where a group was "too tired to go on" and wanted a helicopter to pick them up. Rangers hiked up and hiked down with the group. (It's a trail, and hiking down is fairly easy.)
    The person who went into Middle leprechaun last year and sat down on a ledge; being fished out by a haul system off a helicopter skid. First off, he shouldn't have been in there in the first place; but he could have gone on in my opinion. It would have been painful (don't know if he had knee/elbow pads but he definitely left some blood on the walls), but it wasn't life threatening.
    There's plenty more. One of my favorites is a "mountaineer" (very loosely used) calls for rescue on a climb. A helicopter comes and gets said hiker. When the helicopter takes off, the hiker sees how close he was to the summit, and wants the helicopter to take him back so he can finish the summit. Expecting that the helicopter will wait for him and fly him down afterwards... >

    These examples are perhaps why hefty charges should be levied on the victim for a rescue. There aren't many people who would forfeit their life to preserve their bank account, but folks looking for an easy out might pause before calling for a rescue if they knew the meter would be running and the bill was going to hurt from the moment they did. Don't like the idea of paying full boat for your rescue? Then see if someone will write you an insurance policy. Otherwise, man (or woman) up. A sense of entitlement regarding free rescues probably does more to breed bad behavior than the electronic ability to call for one. I would bet that many of the people who think there should be no charge for rescues are also the types of people who think they should receive damages from the Park Service if they trip over a rock on a Park trail.

    Yeah, and I should get a billion dollar bailout at others' expense if I run my company into the ground...
  17. restrac2000

    restrac2000 Guest

    > These examples are perhaps why hefty charges should be levied on the victim for a rescue. There aren't many people who would forfeit their life to preserve their bank account, but folks looking for an easy out might pause before calling for a rescue if they knew the meter would be running and the bill was going to hurt from the moment they did. Don't like the idea of paying full boat for your rescue? Then see if someone will write you an insurance policy. Otherwise, man (or woman) up. A sense of entitlement regarding free rescues probably does more to breed bad behavior than the electronic ability to call for one. I would bet that many of the people who think there should be no charge for rescues are also the types of people who think they should receive damages from the Park Service if they trip over a rock on a Park trail.
    Yeah, and I should get a billion dollar bailout at others' expense if I run my company into the ground... >

    First, the examples above are unfortunate examples of wasted resources for SAR. That said I don't think the majority of SAR rescues involves such frivolous victims. Having been the victim in a SAR rescue I can say that I, and others I have known, do not feel entitled to free services. For me, I am a fan of personal accountability and paying a reasonable fee for the services rendered. That said, the total fees for SAR services, ambulance, and hospitalization are cost prohibitive and almost drove me to bankruptcy. Considering medical bills are the #1 reason for bankruptcy the solution you recommend seems both punitive and counter-productive.

    To me there seems to be a spectrum between personal accountability and a compassionate system that recognizes unintentional mistakes. Your recommendation seems to be a gross simplification of the issues and I fear would do more harm than good. A usable solution, IMHO, would focus on the bigger issue, be preventative instead of reactive, and punish the few who take advantage of the system not the majority who truly need it in an emergency.

    Second, the matter of technology versus entitlement and their prospective consequences. Research on this issue has been extremely limited, from what I have been able to find. I know of no studies on entitlement and only one empirical study of technologies role on risk management. It was conducted on Outward Bound groups out east and showed no statistical "significance" of knowledge of SAT phones on behavior. The study was extremely limited and conducted within a guided population. Yet, it is the only study I am aware of and conducted in a worthy fashion.

    Anecdotal evidence conflicts with these findings, but that is expected to some level within a normal distribution. While I understand the science, I also believe "significance" will likely be found within specific subgroups, especially in technical sports and solo hiking, if more specific studies are conducted. Having used the technology I know first hand there is an element of comfort that must be rigorously overcome or balanced in the presence of my SPOT (or SAT phone, have used both). It becomes easy to rationalize risks when an accident becomes a matter of discomfort versus life threatening. A SPOT allows me to effectively deal with non-fatal injuries, like broken limbs etc, in the backcountry when otherwise I would be left to my own devices. That knowledge most definitely has an effect on decision making before I enter into specific behaviors.

    While I have no evidence for my ideas I do believe technology will likely have more effect on the backcountry than "entitlement". This is in large part because I think the examples and mentality described are a minority of backcountry SAR cases. Time and research will tell. Hope managers, SAR teams, and outdoorsman can find a more functional system than the polarized factions of this long standing debate tend to propose.

    Phillip
  18. tomcandoit

    tomcandoit Guest

    --- In Yahoo Canyons Group, "restrac2000" <Happyfeet00@...> wrote:

    These examples are perhaps why hefty charges should be levied on the victim for a rescue.

    I don't normally post but thought you might want to know that rescues are not always free. I was hurt a few years ago in Fat Mans Misery, which is just outside of the Zion NP boundary. Maybe you get a free rescue if you are hurt inside the park, I don't know.

    I was very, very lucky to be helicopered out (Thank you Dean Kurtz!). That bill alone was $6,222.00. (Then the real physical and financial nightmare began...)

    As Rich Carlson says: Be safe and have fun.
  19. Tom Jones

    Tom Jones Guest

    Is this a story, we could possibly coerce you into telling???? Captain Morgan's truth serum required?????

    Tom

    --- In Yahoo Canyons Group, "tomcandoit" <tomcandoit@...> wrote:
    --- In Yahoo Canyons Group, "restrac2000" <Happyfeet00@> wrote:


    > These examples are perhaps why hefty charges should be levied on the victim for a rescue.
    I don't normally post but thought you might want to know that rescues are not always free. I was hurt a few years ago in Fat Mans Misery, which is just outside of the Zion NP boundary. Maybe you get a free rescue if you are hurt inside the park, I don't know.
    I was very, very lucky to be helicopered out (Thank you Dean Kurtz!). That bill alone was $6,222.00. (Then the real physical and financial nightmare began...)
    As Rich Carlson says: Be safe and have fun. >
  20. Dean

    Dean Guest

    You're welcome, my pleasure. Hope you're all healed up and back out enjoying the outdoors!

    While I'm not privy to the decisions Kane County makes, and correct me if I'm wrong, but the $6,222.00 was only for the helicopter, and Kane Co. did not bill you for services? The reason for the helicopter bill is that Classic Lifeguard is a privately owned air ambulance service, not supported by taxpayers. While Kane Co. (and most public entities) reserve the right to bill, it's very rare that any of them do.

    Dean


    > These examples are perhaps why hefty charges should be levied on the victim for a rescue.
    I don't normally post but thought you might want to know that rescues are not always free. I was hurt a few years ago in Fat Mans Misery, which is just outside of the Zion NP boundary. Maybe you get a free rescue if you are hurt inside the park, I don't know.
    I was very, very lucky to be helicopered out (Thank you Dean Kurtz!). That bill alone was $6,222.00. (Then the real physical and financial nightmare began...)
    As Rich Carlson says: Be safe and have fun. >
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