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Shinob Canyon - Timpie Fork

  • The Hype

    Set among soaring Wingate walls under a sky-scape of white capped Navajo sandstone domes, the three east forks of Shinob provide some of the best scenery in the park. Most forks can easily be done in a half day, providing the opportunity to combine canyons and hikes, and tailor the day’s adventure. Each fork has a distinctly different flavor with opportunity for the canyoneer to practice a variety of skill sets. Do the middle fork, Timpie, for a hidden arch, a taste of a big rap (275 ft), and practice with a rope-eating crack.

    Getting There

    Road
    Access is via the paved scenic drive, and the gravel/dirt Grand Wash road. The Grand Wash road is accessible to passenger cars under most conditions. The park may close this road when flash floods are threatening.

    To get there, turn onto the scenic drive at the visitor center. Head south for approximately 3.4 miles to the Grand Wash turnoff. Drive East on the Grand Wash road for approximately 1.3 miles to the parking area for Grand Wash and Cassidy Arch. There is an outhouse at the trailhead.

    From the Trailhead
    Look past the Cassidy Arch trailhead sign and note a drainage pouring into Grand Wash across the way. This is Bear Canyon. Your goal is to cross Bear Canyon from the north and climb to a nice ledge system on the south side of Grand Wash, which will take you around the heads of the three forks of Shinob (and up Fern’s Nipple if you wish to combine your canyon with a rewarding peak hike--add two hours for this side trip). From the trailhead start hiking up Grand Wash, taking note of the slanting ledge systems to your right (East). The first step is to get on a mid-to-high level ledge. The route is well cairned. At the first opportunity cross Bear Canyon and follow the cairned route through a series of ledges. When you arrive at a relatively very wide pink and white sandstone ledge layer begin contouring along this ledge to the south, admiring the view of Cassidy Arch (and canyon) to the NW as you go. The first canyon system you encounter is Na-gah canyon. The second canyon you encounter is Timpie Canyon. Find your way into the canyon bottom and you will soon encounter the first drop. Some of the early drops in the canyon are by-passable, but please tread lightly if you choose to find a way around these early raps. If you choose to rappel, please set your anchor to avoid rope pull grooves.

    The Canyon - Rating: 4A III   Longest Rap: 275'   # of Raps: 3-5

    Skills Required
    Rigging proper friction for a long rappel, including adding and reducing friction while on rappel if needed. A member of the group may need to up-climb the crack at the bottom of the big rappel if the rope gets jammed after pulling the rope.

    Additional Risk
    On the big rappel be prepared to add extra friction. The rappel ends in a long crack which has boulders and logs that the rope may become tangled on after it is pulled. A member of the group may have to up-climb the crack to free the rope from obstacles. The pull cord must be rigged to pull from a short distance down-canyon from the bottom of the crack, or else the angle is sharp and the rope is difficult to pull.

    Water
    There could be water at the bottom of the big rappel and the next several drops. If so, it is likely to be brief and shallow; however, this could be deeper if the canyon gets scoured. The next section of canyon is shady and cold and could be slow if the group has problems with the pull on the big rappel and if the anchor for the next rappel has to be rebuilt. Extra layers of warm clothes (fleece) are advised, but wetsuits are not except in the coldest, wettest conditions, or with big slow groups.

    Anchor Conditions
    Capitol Reef’s rules regarding anchors are as follows:
    • Installation of new bolts is prohibited.
    • Replacing existing unsafe bolts is allowed.
    • The use of power drills is prohibited.
    • Where necessary to leave or replace webbing the webbing should closely match the color of the surrounding rock.
    This canyon lends itself nicely to natural anchors. The last drop used to have an old piton in the crack, which has recently been replaced by a bolt. Please do not place new bolts in this canyon, as it could compromise future access to the canyons in Capitol Reef. In the places in the canyon where there are no bolts there are plenty of natural anchor possibilities.

    Gear Recommendation
    Gear for rappels up to 275 ft, helmet, harness, rappel device, slings, 50 feet of webbing, and 3-4 rapides. Body armor is not necessary, but may be appreciated by beginner down climbers,and will come in handy if it is necessary to climb the rope-eating crack to retrieve your rope. Pack size is not a concern. Bring extra layers if conditions are wet.

    Flash Flood Danger
    Low. If flash floods are expected in the area the road to the Grand Wash trailhead may be closed and/or impassable.

    The Exit

    After the last rappel, walk to the end of the canyon and turn right (north) into the main fork of Shinob. Head toward the Grand Wash road, then turn right (East) on the road. The trailhead is approximately ¼ mile.

    Red Tape

    Access
    Up to date access information, including a single page printable access and emergency information card is available here

    Group Size Limits
    Groups are limited to 6 people on backcountry routes (including canyoneering routes) in Capitol Reef, with the exception of Cassidy Canyon, Old School Canyon, and The Wives, which are limited to 12 people.

    Permits
    A permit is not required for canyoneering in Capitol Reef at this time.

    Entrance Fee
    The Scenic drive is the only area of Capitol Reef where an entry fee or park pass is required. Passes can be attained at the visitor center or at a self-pay kiosk at the start of the scenic drive. Fees are good for seven days and are as follows:
    • Individual on foot or bicycle: $7.00 (the fee was increased on June 1, 2015)
    • Motorcycle or private vehicle: $10.00 (the fee was increased on June 1, 2015)
    • Capitol Reef National Park Annual Pass: $30.00, available at the visitor center
    • Federal Interagency Annual Pass: $80.00, available at the visitor center
  • Road
    Access is via the paved scenic drive, and the gravel/dirt Grand Wash road. The Grand Wash road is accessible to passenger cars under most conditions. The park may close this road when flash floods are threatening.

    To get there, turn onto the scenic drive at the visitor center. Head south for approximately 3.4 miles to the Grand Wash turnoff. Drive East on the Grand Wash road for approximately 1.3 miles to the parking area for Grand Wash and Cassidy Arch. There is an outhouse at the trailhead.

    From the Trailhead
    Look past the Cassidy Arch trailhead sign and note a drainage pouring into Grand Wash across the way. This is Bear Canyon. Your goal is to cross Bear Canyon from the north and climb to a nice ledge system on the south side of Grand Wash, which will take you around the heads of the three forks of Shinob (and up Fern’s Nipple if you wish to combine your canyon with a rewarding peak hike--add two hours for this side trip). From the trailhead start hiking up Grand Wash, taking note of the slanting ledge systems to your right (East). The first step is to get on a mid-to-high level ledge. The route is well cairned. At the first opportunity cross Bear Canyon and follow the cairned route through a series of ledges. When you arrive at a relatively very wide pink and white sandstone ledge layer begin contouring along this ledge to the south, admiring the view of Cassidy Arch (and canyon) to the NW as you go. The first canyon system you encounter is Na-gah canyon. The second canyon you encounter is Timpie Canyon. Find your way into the canyon bottom and you will soon encounter the first drop. Some of the early drops in the canyon are by-passable, but please tread lightly if you choose to find a way around these early raps. If you choose to rappel, please set your anchor to avoid rope pull grooves.
  • Skills Required
    Rigging proper friction for a long rappel, including adding and reducing friction while on rappel if needed. A member of the group may need to up-climb the crack at the bottom of the big rappel if the rope gets jammed after pulling the rope.

    Additional Risk
    On the big rappel be prepared to add extra friction. The rappel ends in a long crack which has boulders and logs that the rope may become tangled on after it is pulled. A member of the group may have to up-climb the crack to free the rope from obstacles. The pull cord must be rigged to pull from a short distance down-canyon from the bottom of the crack, or else the angle is sharp and the rope is difficult to pull.

    Water
    There could be water at the bottom of the big rappel and the next several drops. If so, it is likely to be brief and shallow; however, this could be deeper if the canyon gets scoured. The next section of canyon is shady and cold and could be slow if the group has problems with the pull on the big rappel and if the anchor for the next rappel has to be rebuilt. Extra layers of warm clothes (fleece) are advised, but wetsuits are not except in the coldest, wettest conditions, or with big slow groups.

    Anchor Conditions
    Capitol Reef’s rules regarding anchors are as follows:
    • Installation of new bolts is prohibited.
    • Replacing existing unsafe bolts is allowed.
    • The use of power drills is prohibited.
    • Where necessary to leave or replace webbing the webbing should closely match the color of the surrounding rock.
    This canyon lends itself nicely to natural anchors. The last drop used to have an old piton in the crack, which has recently been replaced by a bolt. Please do not place new bolts in this canyon, as it could compromise future access to the canyons in Capitol Reef. In the places in the canyon where there are no bolts there are plenty of natural anchor possibilities.

    Gear Recommendation
    Gear for rappels up to 275 ft, helmet, harness, rappel device, slings, 50 feet of webbing, and 3-4 rapides. Body armor is not necessary, but may be appreciated by beginner down climbers,and will come in handy if it is necessary to climb the rope-eating crack to retrieve your rope. Pack size is not a concern. Bring extra layers if conditions are wet.

    Flash Flood Danger
    Low. If flash floods are expected in the area the road to the Grand Wash trailhead may be closed and/or impassable.
  • After the last rappel, walk to the end of the canyon and turn right (north) into the main fork of Shinob. Head toward the Grand Wash road, then turn right (East) on the road. The trailhead is approximately ¼ mile.
  • Access
    Up to date access information, including a single page printable access and emergency information card is available here

    Group Size Limits
    Groups are limited to 6 people on backcountry routes (including canyoneering routes) in Capitol Reef, with the exception of Cassidy Canyon, Old School Canyon, and The Wives, which are limited to 12 people.

    Permits
    A permit is not required for canyoneering in Capitol Reef at this time.

    Entrance Fee
    The Scenic drive is the only area of Capitol Reef where an entry fee or park pass is required. Passes can be attained at the visitor center or at a self-pay kiosk at the start of the scenic drive. Fees are good for seven days and are as follows:
    • Individual on foot or bicycle: $7.00 (the fee was increased on June 1, 2015)
    • Motorcycle or private vehicle: $10.00 (the fee was increased on June 1, 2015)
    • Capitol Reef National Park Annual Pass: $30.00, available at the visitor center
    • Federal Interagency Annual Pass: $80.00, available at the visitor center

Condition Reports for Shinob Canyon - Timpie Fork

The information provided here is intended for entertainment purposes only. The creator of this information and/or Canyon Collective are not liable for any harm or damage caused by this information. Conditions in the backcountry are constantly changing, only you are responsible for your safety and well being.