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Kanarra Creek

Zion beta posted by Bill
  • The Hype

    The Hype
    Kanarra Creek is a beautiful hike up a very photogenic water filled canyon. The trail head is located in the town of Kanarraville a few miles south of Cedar City just off I-15. Kanarra Creek is the source of drinking water for the town of Kanarraville so tread very lightly and make sure you pick up any trash you find in the canyon. Parking can also be and issue so make sure you have $10 cash to pay the fee at the new (2012) trail head. Water shoes (not flip flops) are a must for this canyon and flash flooding is extremely possible during threatening weather.

    Getting There

    Access
    Exit 1-15 and follow the signage for Kanarraville. From main street turn east on 100 north and just before the road ends at the gate turn left into a dirt parking lot that is accessible to all vehicles. This designated parking area is new as of 2011 and it still not visible on google maps as of 3/2013. There is a $10 parking fee, free parking is available but you will need to park at the town hall and walk to the trail head. There have also been rumors of an "access fee" along the trail where a local will charge you $4 due to the road/trail crossing private property. I hiked Kanarra twice in 2012 and was never promoted to pay this access fee. If anyone has detailed information on this it would be appreciated.

    From the Trailhead: Follow the gated dirt road up the hill and into the canyon. This approach hike can be very hot in the summer so pack plenty of water. Avoid disturbing the pipeline that's exposed near the second creek crossing. Just after the third creek crossing the road ends and you will enter the creek. The lower creek crossings should be knee deep or less anything higher than this could make hiking this canyon very dangerous.

    The Canyon - Rating: 2A II   Longest Rap: 0'   # of Raps: 0

    When the road ends there's no sense in trying to avoid the water. Cross the stream and stay left on one of the many social trails in this lower section of the canyon. There will be some mild scrambling and a few knee deep pools before you enter the first slot, the water here will be wall to wall and about ankle deep in good conditions. The slot will make two short bends and you will arrive at the first very photogenic waterfall with a log ladder. Stop for a nice long photo break and if you feel up to it, carefully climb up the ladder to the canyon above. The pool just above the first waterfall can be about belly deep so make sure you protect that camera gear and scramble out on the right side. Few bends later you will come to a wider section of the canyon with a beautiful cascade and lots of greenery followed by the second narrow slot. The entrance to the slot can be a bit slippery when exiting a waist deep pool in the course of the flowing water. I always dry bag my camera here because a slip could most definitely result in submersion. The canyon will bend right and the second waterfall will come into view. There is a ladder that leads above this falls but it doesn't tend to be as stable as the previous.

    The Exit

    Enjoy the cool water, take lots of photos, and return the way you came in.

    Red Tape

    As mentioned there is a $10 parking fee and a possible $4 access fee but no permits are required.
  • Access
    Exit 1-15 and follow the signage for Kanarraville. From main street turn east on 100 north and just before the road ends at the gate turn left into a dirt parking lot that is accessible to all vehicles. This designated parking area is new as of 2011 and it still not visible on google maps as of 3/2013. There is a $10 parking fee, free parking is available but you will need to park at the town hall and walk to the trail head. There have also been rumors of an "access fee" along the trail where a local will charge you $4 due to the road/trail crossing private property. I hiked Kanarra twice in 2012 and was never promoted to pay this access fee. If anyone has detailed information on this it would be appreciated.

    From the Trailhead: Follow the gated dirt road up the hill and into the canyon. This approach hike can be very hot in the summer so pack plenty of water. Avoid disturbing the pipeline that's exposed near the second creek crossing. Just after the third creek crossing the road ends and you will enter the creek. The lower creek crossings should be knee deep or less anything higher than this could make hiking this canyon very dangerous.
  • When the road ends there's no sense in trying to avoid the water. Cross the stream and stay left on one of the many social trails in this lower section of the canyon. There will be some mild scrambling and a few knee deep pools before you enter the first slot, the water here will be wall to wall and about ankle deep in good conditions. The slot will make two short bends and you will arrive at the first very photogenic waterfall with a log ladder. Stop for a nice long photo break and if you feel up to it, carefully climb up the ladder to the canyon above. The pool just above the first waterfall can be about belly deep so make sure you protect that camera gear and scramble out on the right side. Few bends later you will come to a wider section of the canyon with a beautiful cascade and lots of greenery followed by the second narrow slot. The entrance to the slot can be a bit slippery when exiting a waist deep pool in the course of the flowing water. I always dry bag my camera here because a slip could most definitely result in submersion. The canyon will bend right and the second waterfall will come into view. There is a ladder that leads above this falls but it doesn't tend to be as stable as the previous.
  • Enjoy the cool water, take lots of photos, and return the way you came in.
  • As mentioned there is a $10 parking fee and a possible $4 access fee but no permits are required.
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