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Dry Hollow

Escalante beta posted by a.c
  • The Hype

    A quick canyon with an approach nearly as short as Zion's Pine Creek.

    Getting There

    Drive Utah Highway 12 to mile 83.8 and park on the south shoulder of the road. Here the highway crosses Dry Hollow.

    Walk south for about twenty feet to the top of a steep slope created by highway construction. Drop down this hill and walk fifty feet to the entry rap. This takes about one minute from your car.

    The Canyon - Rating: 3AI   Longest Rap: 65'   # of Raps: 1

    Tie an 80' rope to a Pinyon Pine on the canyon's left (E) side and drop in. You can collect the rope while returning to your car.

    A few hundred feet of PG stemming and down climbing follow the rappel.

    The Exit

    At the bottom of the final downclimb, walk down canyon for a couple hundred feet to where a slot enters on the right (W) side of the canyon. From here you can see the exit route up a slickrock prow about 100' down canyon on the right (W) side.
    Climb to the top. At the top go west for 20' then turn north and follow the canyon rim back to the entry rappel.

    If you want a longer adventure you can continue down canyon from this exit through more narrows (though they may be of little interest to the technical slot junkie) and easy exits out the left (E) side. To exit, choose an exit spot and ascend low angled slickrock to the top of the Navajo Sandstone. Then walk NNW along the canyon's rim back to the entry rappel.

    Red Tape

    BLM Land: Dry Hollow is located in Grand Staircase Escalante National Monument, and currently a permit is not required for day hikes. There are, however, group size limits in GSENM. The area in which this canyon is a primitive zone, and has a group size limit of 12.

    http://www.blm.gov/ut/st/en/fo/grand_staircase-escalante/Recreation/group_size.html

    Most slot canyons are found on public lands managed by the US Government, although a few can be found on private lands. The US Forest Service, the Bureau of Land Management, and the National Park Service manage these lands. Each area tends to have unique management issues. As a result, there is not a uniform set of rules governing our use of these lands. For current issues related to canyoneering access, please visit www.americancanyoneers.org.
  • Drive Utah Highway 12 to mile 83.8 and park on the south shoulder of the road. Here the highway crosses Dry Hollow.

    Walk south for about twenty feet to the top of a steep slope created by highway construction. Drop down this hill and walk fifty feet to the entry rap. This takes about one minute from your car.
  • Tie an 80' rope to a Pinyon Pine on the canyon's left (E) side and drop in. You can collect the rope while returning to your car.

    A few hundred feet of PG stemming and down climbing follow the rappel.
  • At the bottom of the final downclimb, walk down canyon for a couple hundred feet to where a slot enters on the right (W) side of the canyon. From here you can see the exit route up a slickrock prow about 100' down canyon on the right (W) side.
    Climb to the top. At the top go west for 20' then turn north and follow the canyon rim back to the entry rappel.

    If you want a longer adventure you can continue down canyon from this exit through more narrows (though they may be of little interest to the technical slot junkie) and easy exits out the left (E) side. To exit, choose an exit spot and ascend low angled slickrock to the top of the Navajo Sandstone. Then walk NNW along the canyon's rim back to the entry rappel.
  • BLM Land: Dry Hollow is located in Grand Staircase Escalante National Monument, and currently a permit is not required for day hikes. There are, however, group size limits in GSENM. The area in which this canyon is a primitive zone, and has a group size limit of 12.

    http://www.blm.gov/ut/st/en/fo/grand_staircase-escalante/Recreation/group_size.html

    Most slot canyons are found on public lands managed by the US Government, although a few can be found on private lands. The US Forest Service, the Bureau of Land Management, and the National Park Service manage these lands. Each area tends to have unique management issues. As a result, there is not a uniform set of rules governing our use of these lands. For current issues related to canyoneering access, please visit www.americancanyoneers.org.
The information provided here is intended for entertainment purposes only. The creator of this information and/or Canyon Collective are not liable for any harm or damage caused by this information. Conditions in the backcountry are constantly changing, only you are responsible for your safety and well being.