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Benson Creek

Zion beta posted by MTN_DUDE
  • The Hype

    Benson Creek is fun canyon with flowing water and rappels in waterfalls. Benson Creek flows almost year round, and plays a great canyon host for those hot summer days. It is also a nice change of scenery from the Zion National Park Canyons to the south.

    Getting There

    Access Road: UT Highway 143 from Parowan to Brian Head

    From the Trailhead: The trailhead is approximately 6 miles from the center of Parowan, at the Parowan Canyon Wildlife Management Area parking lot on the SE side of the road. The parking lot is a large gravel area (on the left if heading toward Brian Head) with a giant sign that says, “Parowan Canyon Wildlife Management Area.” It’s hard to miss.

    Access to the canyon starts from a well-maintained trail. There are several forks in the trail. At the first fork, go right and cross over a large bridge. From there take the left fork when the trail splits. When you get to the picnic benches you’ll leave the trail and start up the mountain in front of you (to the east). Pick your path up the talus slope and find the easiest route. This is a steep slope with loose rocks, tread carefully (busted ankles don’t work well).

    Once past the talus slope it is just a matter of following the cairns (provided they are still standing) to the east and then down into the canyon (which will be to the North). Once you reach the creek follow it downstream (going West) to the first rappel. If you drop down too soon you’ll find the rim of the canyon and have to follow the rim east until you find walk-in access to the creek and first rappel.

    The Canyon - Rating: 3 B II   Longest Rap: 105   # of Raps: 4

    Skills required: Technical Canyoneering Skills required

    Rappels: 4 rappels, up to 105'. Each rappel is in the water course.
    First rappel is the longest, 105’. A large fir is situated above the rappel for an anchor.
    Second rappel is a two stage rappel about 30’ long. Bolts on canyon right.
    Third rappel, 30’, is approx. 100 yards down canyon and can be anchored on a tree to canyon left.
    Last rappel, 30’, should be anchored off a tree, canyon left. Bolts have been placed on the right wall as well.


    Additional Risks:

    Water

    Benson Creek flows year-round, though usually not with enough flow to consider it a class “C” canyon, but you will be getting wet. You can check the flow by taking a short walk to the bottom of the canyon before proceeding with the approach hike. If the flow is more than a trickle you may need additional skills, gear, and thermal protection to descend the canyon safely, or it may be wise to find an alternate activity for the day.

    Anchor Conditions
    There are plenty of natural anchors that can be used to safely rappel Benson Creek. Bolts have been added.

    Gear Recommendations
    Helmet, harness, rappel device, slings, 30’ of webbing, quick-links, and rope for 105’ rappel.

    Flash Flood Danger: Moderate to High

    The Exit

    Once off the fourth rappel follow the maintained trail back to the picnic tables you left earlier, then back to your car.

    Red Tape

    No permits required.

    The canyon is in a Dixie National Forest Wildlife Management Area. Group size limits on National Forest are usually 12 people.
  • Access Road: UT Highway 143 from Parowan to Brian Head

    From the Trailhead: The trailhead is approximately 6 miles from the center of Parowan, at the Parowan Canyon Wildlife Management Area parking lot on the SE side of the road. The parking lot is a large gravel area (on the left if heading toward Brian Head) with a giant sign that says, “Parowan Canyon Wildlife Management Area.” It’s hard to miss.

    Access to the canyon starts from a well-maintained trail. There are several forks in the trail. At the first fork, go right and cross over a large bridge. From there take the left fork when the trail splits. When you get to the picnic benches you’ll leave the trail and start up the mountain in front of you (to the east). Pick your path up the talus slope and find the easiest route. This is a steep slope with loose rocks, tread carefully (busted ankles don’t work well).

    Once past the talus slope it is just a matter of following the cairns (provided they are still standing) to the east and then down into the canyon (which will be to the North). Once you reach the creek follow it downstream (going West) to the first rappel. If you drop down too soon you’ll find the rim of the canyon and have to follow the rim east until you find walk-in access to the creek and first rappel.
  • Skills required: Technical Canyoneering Skills required

    Rappels: 4 rappels, up to 105'. Each rappel is in the water course.
    First rappel is the longest, 105’. A large fir is situated above the rappel for an anchor.
    Second rappel is a two stage rappel about 30’ long. Bolts on canyon right.
    Third rappel, 30’, is approx. 100 yards down canyon and can be anchored on a tree to canyon left.
    Last rappel, 30’, should be anchored off a tree, canyon left. Bolts have been placed on the right wall as well.


    Additional Risks:

    Water

    Benson Creek flows year-round, though usually not with enough flow to consider it a class “C” canyon, but you will be getting wet. You can check the flow by taking a short walk to the bottom of the canyon before proceeding with the approach hike. If the flow is more than a trickle you may need additional skills, gear, and thermal protection to descend the canyon safely, or it may be wise to find an alternate activity for the day.

    Anchor Conditions
    There are plenty of natural anchors that can be used to safely rappel Benson Creek. Bolts have been added.

    Gear Recommendations
    Helmet, harness, rappel device, slings, 30’ of webbing, quick-links, and rope for 105’ rappel.

    Flash Flood Danger: Moderate to High
  • Once off the fourth rappel follow the maintained trail back to the picnic tables you left earlier, then back to your car.
  • No permits required.

    The canyon is in a Dixie National Forest Wildlife Management Area. Group size limits on National Forest are usually 12 people.
The information provided here is intended for entertainment purposes only. The creator of this information and/or Canyon Collective are not liable for any harm or damage caused by this information. Conditions in the backcountry are constantly changing, only you are responsible for your safety and well being.